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  • MauricePColgan wrote on July 24, 2010 report

    Thank you C Michael Bailey. A fine summing up.

    Increasingly popular music writers and commentators are being forced to reappraise the unique role Elvis Presley played in the developement and history of popular music.
    The sheer versatility and range of the extraordinary vocalist just could not be written off so easily.
    So here we are in the age when learned writers like Greil Marcus and Vernon Chadwick put into highbrow words what the common man instantly recognised as soon as he first heard Elvis sing.
    Elvis Presley in all his lives and at his most committed had compiled a body of song on record that would astound all those who took the time to listen.
    Ballads, Country, Gospel, Christmas Carols, Rock 'n' Roll, Hymns, and yes even traditional Jazz, Elvis took in his stride as he broadened and stretched the music borders flanking his critics at every turn.
    For the lucky people that were there from the beginning the Elvis Presley story has turned into a saga like no other in the history of popular music.
    http://irelandtoo.blogspot.com

  • C. Michael Bailey wrote on July 24, 2010 report

    Amen. To reduce Presley to a simple country rube as Goldman did, thereby resigning the culture that produced him to the same class is to engage in the worst doublespeak. We can not have it both ways. Presley either changed everything or nothing, and the latter is simply a temporal impossibility.

  • C. Michael Bailey wrote on July 26, 2010 report

    It is not hard to think of Presley in the same vein as Ray Charles. Both artists transcended genre. The closest persons existing today that do this are Willie Nelson and Van Morrison.