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  • Klijn wrote on October 26, 2006 report

    With all respects to the guys he played
    with, Don Goldie (son of Harry Goldfield
    of the Paul Whiteman band) is one of, so
    not maybe the best, trumpeter I heard in
    my 40 years carierre as (amateur) musician and
    collector of amarican and english
    dance/jazzbands.
    I Think he's the unknown and unrewarded &
    underestimated trumpettopper of the 50's
    & sixties jazzscene.

    Greetings,
    Dick Klijn
    h.g.klijn@hotmail.com
    Haarlem, The Netherlands

  • Gary Hastings wrote on August 28, 2009 report

    I agree with Dick. I really loved Don's playing. We he died I was lucky to buy about 20 albums from a small label from his estate. I often heart the best of both Bobby Hackett and Al Hirt in his playing.

    Gary Hastings
    Lead Trumpet
    Guy Lombardo Orchestra

  • Thomas Andrew Leps wrote on November 02, 2009 report

    I would put Don Goldie up with the best - Harry James, Al Hirt, Louis Armstrong and Doc Severinsen. Each has his own style of delivery. My personal favorite is Harry James. I have four King trumpets once owned by Harry, his last Parduba mouthpiece and trumpet case.
    Admiring Goldie's talent, I have a question for anyone who might know - what make and model horn did Don play and what make and model number mouthpiece did he play?
    Thanks!
    Tom Leps
    Professional Trumpet Player
    adaireandtom@comcast.net

  • Pat Henry wrote on June 01, 2010 report

    Don Goldie was a friend of mine for a period of more than thirty years. I have one of is horns - a Selmer K-modified, model 24-b. He had two others - and was buried with one of them. One time I was at his place in Miami and we went to dinner together - afterwards we went into his living room and talked jazz for hours - and his horn was sitting on the coffee table and there were three mouthpieces on the lamp table. I asked him why he had three different mouthpieces and he said "sometimes my lip is swollen - sometimes it isn't" - I am pretty sure they were all Bach mouthpieces and I remember one being a 5C.

    Pat Henry
    Professional Trumpet Player

  • Rob Delisa wrote on August 13, 2011 report

    Great story about the mouthpieces, Pat. Darn...would have loved to listen to this guy play:


    http://trumpetsearch.com