Extended Analysis

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Arthur Barron, David Liebman, Abel Pabon: The Miami Jazz Project

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Always on the lookout for outstanding players to join him, NEA Jazz Master saxophonist, flautist, and composer David Liebman finds in the The Miami Jazz Project a simpatico group of musicians to echo and recapitulate his interest in the post- Coltrane concatenation of fusion and world music where his career first took off in the 1970s. Liebman is the obvious inspiration for this album, which is spearheaded by one of his long-time saxophone colleagues, Arthur Baron, and features a rhythm section of Abel Pabón on keyboards, Josh Allen on acoustic and electric basses (with Eric England substituting on bass in ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

David Sylvian: There's a Light That Enters Houses With No Other House in Sight

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David Sylvian's extended flight from pop stardom in the middle years of the 1980s was an enthralling counterpoint to that decade's facile obsession with surface and relapse into materialism. While mainstream pop retreated from the innovations and musical openness of post-punk into the empty banalities of bean counting corporate rock, Sylvian among a few others appeared to plot a different idiosyncratic path routed in improvised music and jazz. Central to this were his often inspired choices of collaborators such as the late Kenny Wheeler, Jon Hassell, Bill Nelson, Riuichi Sakamoto and Robert Fripp that opened a window on ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Rory Gallagher: Irish Tour '74 Deluxe Edition

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Of all the entries in the Rory Gallagher discography-and it's lengthy despite his premature passing in 1995 at the age of forty-seven-none deserve the expanded treatment more than Irish Tour '74, which is not doubt why it was originally documented on film as it happened by Tony Palmer. Not only did the title set the standard for the many subsequent live releases of Gallagher's career, the abbreviated tour reaffirmed the man's loyalty to his native country, a theme he would also revisit numerous times prior to his untimely demise. Not his first concert piece-Live in Europe (Polydor, 1972) ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Leonard Cohen: Popular Problems

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On 21st of September, Leonard Cohen, member of an elite triumvirate of singer songwriters joined the 80 club. A day after his birthday, he delivered a new record and another chapter of his life opened to the public. Cohen is one of those singer songwriters that have kept maturing, producing new and interesting work with every advancing decade of his life. And there is something wondrous about Cohen delivering a new record for his 80th birthday. That he is delivering a masterpiece of a record is even more wondrous thing than that. Several months after the mammoth tour that saw ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Now's the time III: The best in contemporary jazz from France and [tax haven] Luxembourg

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Every. One. Of. These. Tracks. Is. A. Keeper. To be swept up in a fervor when listening to music (always an unexpected pleasure) and finding it next to impossible not to write about the experience--during as well as after--is the dream all music journalists crave and celebrate every time they find themselves returning to that zone. Indeed, and in case you didn't know, every one of the writers you read here at allboutjazz.com writes for free. Why? My guess is because they 1) haven't been given a paying assignment on what they are writing about, 2) they just need to ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

U2: Songs of Innocence Deluxe Edition

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Given the controversy that arose around the unilateral download of U2's Songs of Innocence, it's either brave, foolish or greedy to see the issue of the album in various physical forms in such short order. Yet the group confounds even further in the way they can, when playing and singing, leave behind the posing, pomposity and lethal careerism. Thus, the prospect of unreleased material and alternate takes of tracks from the original list can't help but pique the curiosity. It's safe to say “Lucifer's Hand" boasts a more immediate hook than anything on the original album and it's ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Garcia Live Volume Five: Keystone Berkeley December 31, 1975

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Garcia Live Volume Five begins appropriately and propitiously enough as the band slowly, inexorably coalesces around the changes of chuck Berry's “Let It Rock," weaving an insinuating rhythm and melody mix that becomes proportionately more dramatic as the leader of the band begins to sing, seeming off-mike (or perhaps he's just not turned up?), at which point the quartet drops confidently into the pocket of the groove they've only suggested to that point. John Kahn's bass pops and pulses emphatically to anchor the ensemble firmly into place, albeit allowing all the fluidity they needed to utilize the spontaneity of the ...



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