All About Jazz: The web's most comprehensive jazz resource

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All About Jazz: The web's most comprehensive jazz resource

Rethinking Jazz Cultures

Interviews with leading jazz academics.


January 13, 2014

E. Taylor Atkins: Let's Call This... Our Jazz?

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By IAN PATTERSON

African-American vernacular or universal language? Symbol of freedom and equality, or one of nationalist ideals and bourgeois elitism? Folk music or high art? Jazz, since its earliest days, has represented many things to many people. For Professor E. Taylor Atkins, such binary ways of thinking rather over-simplify the arguments. Whereas an either or way of thinking about jazz is merely divisive, Atkins has spent much of the past twenty years arguing for a more inclusive approach to jazz studies, one that recognizes the possibility of multiple meanings and histories. As Presidential Teaching Professor in the History Department of ...

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October 21, 2013

Tony Whyton: What Does Jazz Do For You?

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By IAN PATTERSON

[The first monthly installment of interviews with leading jazz academics as part of All About Jazz's new Rethinking Jazz Cultures series begins with Professor Tony Whyton, Director of the Salford Music Research Centre at the University of Salford.] Wherever you stand on what constitutes jazz music, jazz history and its great historical figures/landmark recordings, Tony Whyton invites you to think again. Whatever your views on jazz criticism, literature and photography, Whyton might just make you see things in a new light. If you think jazz academia is bunk Whyton would like to engage with you, because it's precisely ...

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April 30, 2013

Rhythm Changes: Rethinking Jazz Cultures

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By IAN PATTERSON

Rhythm Changes Media City UK, Salford Rethinking Jazz Cultures Conference Manchester, UK April 11-14, 2013 The study of jazz in academic institutions may be a relatively modern trend, but the presence of over a hundred academics from South Africa to Russia and from America to Portugal at the Rhythm Changes: Rethinking Jazz Cultures conference, at Media City UK, Salford, underlined that it's an undeniably global phenomenon. It's also a sign of the continuing evolution and maturation of historical, socio-political, anthropological and musicological perspectives on music that is more than a century long in the ...

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