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TAKE FIVE WITH...

Take Five with Eddie Reyes

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Meet Eddie Reyes: Eddie Reyes has evolved a unique and personal style on the guitar. Although for much of his playing career he has focused on electric jazz guitar, he now turns mostly to the acoustic. He has evolved his style from, first, a fascination with Brazilian Jazz to his present passion, Flamenco. In the process he developed a way to fuse the authentic rhythms and style of playing inherent in Flamenco with his contemporary jazz language and sensibility. ...

REDISCOVERY

Gallery: Gallery

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GalleyGalleryECM Records1982 Today's discovery is in my top 10 list of albums screaming for first-time issue on CD by Munich's venerable ECM Records. Gallery was a one-off, teaming vibraphonist Dave Samuels and Oregon's Paul McCandless with cellist David Darling, bassist Ratzo Harris and Michael Di Pasqua--a drummer who, with a resume on the label that included Ralph Towner, Jan Garbarek, Double Image and Eberhard Weber, was well on his way to becoming a label staple ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Xiomara Laugart: Tears And Rumba

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Despite over fifty years of political turmoil leading to a ludicrous embargo, the music of Cuba has thrived and is as vibrant as ever. Though many premier Cuban artists have gone into cultural exile in America and abroad, they continue to seek inspiration from and expand upon the music of their homeland, continually performing it around the globe. Vocalist Xiomara Laugart is a prime example of this diaspora, and on Tears and Rumba, she revisits the music of Cuba's romantic ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Luis Lascano: Some Trips

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Luis Lascano may call New York home now, but his music still speaks strongly of his Argentinian origins. On this debut, the bassist delivers six enchanting modern jazz numbers delivered with strong South American accents. Some Trips opens on “El Mandril," a number that lives at the intersection of elegance and allure. Violinist Sergio Reyes and multi-reedist Sam Sadigursky have starring roles here, and both personify those aforementioned traits. Things then take a turn toward the mournful ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Ivan Renta: Take Off - A Musical Odyssey

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There is a time honored tradition in jazz of coming up as a sideman, earning as well as learning, paying some dues, and then moving on to a solo project. Saxophonist Ivan Renta has been doing just that. With an extensive formal music education, a premier session man and after years in the horn section of major salsa and Latin Jazz bands -notably that of Eddie Palmieri -he has released his first record as leader, Take Off -A Musical Odyssey ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Brenda Hopkins Miranda: Aeropiano

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The aphorism that art imitates life is appropriate in describing pianist Brenda Hopkins Miranda. A consummate traveler and beneficiary of a bilingual and bicultural environment, her sense of purpose is to genuinely exploit the piano as a personal extension to convey melodious concepts with deft imagery and drama. Aeropiano is a passage through myriad influences and experiences leading to destinations both real and imagined, where the key is to listen. The title track is introduced by bomba drums ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Matthew Sheens: Untranslatable

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With his impressive debut Every Eight Seconds (Self Produced, 2012) garnering universally positive reviews, Australian-born, New York-based pianist Matthew Sheens returns with an even meatier, juicier follow-up. Every Eight Seconds introduced an original composer, one whose melodic and rhythmic ideas championed narrative over virtuosity. There's perhaps more of Sheens the Downbeat poll-winning pianist this time out but significantly Untranslatable ups the ante compositionally, with the Yanni Burton String Quartet leaving an indelible stamp on a third of the tracks.

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bill O'Connell: Imagine

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Bill O'Connell's version of the standard “Willow Weep For Me" is one of those rare items: playing totally against type as a Latin burner with that classic, mesmerizing two-chord piano vamp, the only thing missing would be someone actually trying to sing this lament amidst the happy sprawl of players and arrangement O'Connell's dished up. Unlike other gestures into Latin-land that sprout from tune to tune with other jazz musicians, what makes Imagine notable is the combination of writing with ...



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