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JAZZ IN THE AQUARIAN AGE

Stan Getz: I'm Gonna Blow the Walls Down

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[The music that Stan Getz made over the years was consistently moving and powerful. But he was probably putting me on a little when he said he was going to “blow the walls down" in New York for a series of shows early in 1979. When someone gives you a headline like that, though, you go with it. He was a little more straightforward later in the interview when he said, “I'm a thoughtful player. I don't believe in blasting music."] “Some people get into music because they want to become famous," says jazz tenor saxophonist Stan Getz, ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Cal Tjader & Stan Getz: Sextet

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Cal Tjader / Stan GetzSextetOriginal Jazz Classics Remasters2011 (1958) The presence of Latin and Afro-Cuban enthusiast, vibraphonist Cal Tjader, has created a widespread misconception that Sextet was the album which sparked tenor saxophonist Stan Getz's fascination with Brazilian music and, ultimately, bossa nova. The notion has, over the years, been reinforced by the inclusion of pianist Vince Guaraldi's “Ginza Samba," whose theme statements were played over a samba beat, and which, as plain “Ginza," was the third track on side one of the album's original LP release. During the Stateside bossa ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Stan Getz Quintette: Jazz At Storyville

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Stan Getz QuintetteJazz At StoryvilleRoyal Roost1951 For his casual listeners, tenor saxophonist Stan Getz peaked during the bossa nova craze of the early to mid 1960s. And as Verve's five-disc, 2008 box set, The Bossa Nova Albums, reminded casual and committed listeners alike, Getz and bossa nova were, indeed, made for each other. But anyone willing to rewind through the 1950s will find a cornucopia of less well known, though equally transporting music, as Getz emerged from the big bands to become a small group leader of style ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Stan Getz: Quintets - The Clef and Norgran Studio Albums

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Stan GetzQuintets: The Clef & Norgran Studio AlbumsVerve/Hip-0 Select2011 A pleasure to handle and a thrill to play, this limited edition box set brings together all the quintet studio recordings made by tenor saxophonist Stan Getz for impresario Norman Granz's Clef and Norgran labels, soon to be rolled together as Verve, between December 1952 and January 1955. The three discs capture Getz's emergence as a small group bandleader newly at the top of his game, and Granz's move from 78rpm singles to 10-inch LPs. The two events coalesced with productive synchronicity. ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Stan Getz: Apasionado

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Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz's neo-big band album Apasionado has been consigned to minor league status since its original release in 1990. It does, indeed, look unpromising: recorded in fall 1989, when Getz was undergoing treatment for the cancer which would kill him less than two years later; with a pair of synthesizers replicating a string section; and with the commercially astute but MOR focused Herb Alpert producing.

But 20 years on and rereleased, Apasionado rises way above expectations. Getz is in soaring form, commanding attention so completely that the ersatz strings, and Alpert's slight arrangements, become irrelevant, barely ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Stan Getz: Legacy

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Here's a pleasant surprise: “previously unissued material" by tenor sax giant Stan Getz that by and large deserves to be more widely disseminated and heard. Legacy is comprised of five sessions spanning the years 1980-86, including three numbers with the Woody Herman Herd and another with Getz and pianist Jimmy Rowles performing Rowles' “The Peacocks." The other seven tracks embody three quartet dates.

While the sound is uneven, as one would expect on such a compilation, the audio's not as poor as one might presume save for the final track, “Lush Life," which sounds as though it could have been ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Stan Getz: Stan Getz with Guest Artist Laurindo Almeida

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This is music that may be impossible to listen to while remaining still. The instant Stan Getz and Laurindo Almeida take off with “Minina Moca" ("Young Lady"), the party's on. Although the performances throughout are masterful, nothing is about showboating. This is music of great beauty in a totally relaxed setting. By the 1960s, Almeida was already a veteran of West Coast studio dates and years with Stan Kenton's big band. Kenton first heard the guitarist in Brazil, persuaded him to come to the US and scored a huge hit with him on “Peanut Vendor." It was ...



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