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CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Pago Libre: John Wolf Brennan - Tscho Theissing - Daniele Patumi - Arkady Shilkloper: Pago Libre

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Pago Libre is one of the finest bands in the biz. This is a reissue of their original 1995 recording for the Germany-based "Bellaphon" label. Essentially, little or nothing is out of this band’s overall scope of capabilities. They commence the festivities with a toe-tapping groove, via bassist Daniele Patumi’s expressive walking bass lines during the opener “Rochade.” Moreover, the quartet systematically integrates subtle variations of the primary theme in concert with unassuming accents and contrasting tonal characteristics.

French hornist Arkady Shilkloper and violinist Tscho Theissing weave chamber-like passages with heated modern jazz flurries throughout. When the ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Pago Libre: Wake Up Call - Live in Italy

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With their 3rd and first “live” recording, the European band, “Pago Libre” shine once again, as they seemingly thrill the Italian audience on Wake Up Call - Live In Italy. Here, the Quartet serve up a freewheeling, enthusiastic and altogether multifarious set featuring memorably melodic compositions along with generous doses of furious improvisation.

This band swings remarkably hard as a drummer-less Quartet, which is evident from the opening moments of Tscho Theissing’s composition titled, “Wake Up Call”. On this piece, bassist Daniele Patumi implements a rapid walking bass line as cunning dialogue ensures between pianist John Wolf Brennan and violinist ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Pago Libre: Wake Up Call: Live in Italy

Pago Libre is a highly accomplished quartet consisting of the master pianist John Wolf Brennan with Arkady Shilkloper (french horn, flugelhorn), Tscho Theissing (violin, voice), and Daniele Patumi (double bass). As may be expected from the instrumentation, there is a good bit of classicism in the sound of this group. Take “Toccattacca," for example. Although Brennan thanks Olivier Messiaen for the derivation of one chord (perhaps with a nod toward reviewers who see influences behind every green tree), this sprawling track seems in its turbulent nobility more to recall Igor Stravinsky. There is in general here a muted exuberance, dark-edged ...



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