Recent Articles

WHAT IS JAZZ?

How Teachers can Swing in the Classroom

Read "How Teachers can Swing in the Classroom"

I am a jazz aficionado as well as a philosophy professor. Being in front of a classroom teaching is my favorite place on earth, second to a good jazz club with hip friends. In the midst of a philosophy class, I may wax enthusiastic about the transcendent qualities of a John Coltrane saxophone solo or the preternatural swing of Buddy Rich's timekeeping or the song-writing and band-leading genius of Duke Ellington. These comments are not merely idiosyncratic. They reflect something of a philosophical theory of pedagogy that is steeped in jazz sensibilities. After over thirty years of teaching philosophy in ...

IN THE STUDIO

Jazz on the Screen: A Jazz and Blues Filmography

Read "Jazz on the Screen: A Jazz and Blues Filmography"

This article appears courtesy of David Meeker and the Library of Congress. Learn more about Jazz on Screen. Overview of Jazz on the Screen By David Meeker The cultural, sociological and technical histories of jazz and motion pictures have run in parallel, sometimes intersecting, lines ever since both forms emerged at the end of the nineteenth century. Neither found it easy to be accepted as a legitimate form of personal or artistic expression. The early days, spent at the very fringes of respectable society, were difficult in each case. Film grew up in vaudeville ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Duke Ellington And His Orchestra: The Treasury Shows, Volume 18

Read "The Treasury Shows, Volume 18" reviewed by

As Duke Ellington leads his band into the opening bars of “Take The A Train," a mighty roar goes up from the radio audience. The moment comes four tracks into the first CD of this double Storyville release, after a somewhat shaky start. With it there's a marvellous feeling of being back in 1946 at the height of Ellington's popularity. The experience is worth having to put up with the patronising ABC Radio master of ceremonies, the now dated love songs Ellington included for dancers and incessant kowtowing to James C. Petrillo, then President ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Duke Ellington: Duke Ellington In Grona Lund

Read "Duke Ellington In Grona Lund" reviewed by

Midsummer is a quite magical time to be in Sweden. The long, dark winter is over and now, as the sun stays resolutely above the horizon, the Lutheran natives shed their somber demeanor, dress in traditional costumes, dance around maypoles decorated with garlands of flowers, drink far too much aquavit and have such a good time they forget all about it the morning after. In 1963 Swedish jazz fans had added reason for celebration: for four weeks, the Duke Ellington band toured the nation's folkparkerna, or “people's parks," to rapturous acclaim. Ellington's men were a world away ...

BOOK REVIEWS

Juan Tizol: His Caravan Through Life and American Culture

Read "Juan Tizol: His Caravan Through Life and American Culture"

Juan Tizol--His Caravan Through Life and American Culture Basilio Serrano Pages ISBN: #978-14691-8166 Xlibris 2012 Basilio Serrano is a seasoned educator, historian and a person who is all too familiar with the plight of Puerto Ricans whose contributions to jazz have been ignored or forgotten. In 2000 he wrote a series of articles on Juan Tizol's cross-cultural collaborations with Duke Ellington, Harry James and other nationally known orchestras. In addition he has written articles about Boricua Pioneers in Latin Jazz, Puerto Rican Musicians of the Harlem Renaissance and essays on pianist Noro ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Duke Ellington And His Orchestra: The Treasury Shows Vol. 17

Read "The Treasury Shows Vol. 17" reviewed by

Don Lowe's exultant cry, “Here he is, and in person, the Duke himself!" kicks off the 17th of the Duke Ellington Treasury Show radio broadcasts, part of a massive reissue project by the Danish Storyville label. Anxious to show how hip, perhaps even hep, he is, the American Broadcasting Corporation announcer goes on to introduce “C-Jam Blues" as a number that's “really here to stay, but solid." In contrast, Ellington behaves with quiet dignity, at one point movingly evoking the image of a dead GI looking in on a world at peace and benefiting ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Duke Ellington: The Ellington Suites

Read "The Ellington Suites" reviewed by

It should not be so hard to identify the most important jazz musician in the history of the genre. It is one of five artists: Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, and Miles Davis. Much can be made for Ellington being the logical choice. Edward Kennedy Ellington (1899-1974) lived the entire history of jazz. He led arguably the most important big band of the swing era while also recording widely in smaller formats. But Ellington considered his music well beyond the definition of jazz. The extended compositions championed by Wynton Marsalis in the 1980s and '90s, germinated in ...



Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.

or search site with Google