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EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Bing Crosby: The CBS Radio Recordings 1954-56

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Bing Crosby The CBS Radio Recordings 1954-56 Mosaic Records 2009

For many years, in millions of homes, singer Bing Crosby ruled the airwaves. A large chunk of the US listened to his Kraft Music Hall on a weekly basis and as a result Crosby was able to dominate the music industry (and later the movie industry) without serious rivals. Aside from developing the template for radio programs, his most notable accomplishment may have been the move from live programming to taped recordings. Understandably, after doing it for years, Crosby wanted to be ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bing Crosby: The Bing Crosby CBS Radio Recordings (1954-56)

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When contemporary culture acknowledges Bing Crosby at all, it is as a relic of ancient pop, his musical conservatism epitomized by “White Christmas." Happily, a new seven-disc Mosaic Records set reminds us that Crosby always swung without strain. In the mid-1950s, when he had apparently been eclipsed by Sinatra, then by Elvis, Crosby was still singing splendidly. The often high-level melodrama of his early records had given way to a masterful casualness.

The 160 tracks in this set were recorded on tape for his daily radio show and find Crosby fronting pianist Buddy Cole's easy-going jazz quartet (anchored ...

CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Bing Crosby: Bing With A Beat

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They just don't write songs like “I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Write Myself A Letter" anymore. It's a catchy melody combined with witty lyrics that conveys an innocent longing for love that would be inconceivable as a radio hit today. However, the same goes for just about any other song on Bing With A Beat.

But then they weren't really writing songs like that in 1957, either. That's when this album first appeared, and none of the songs were in heavy circulation among pop singers at the time. Only “Mack The Knife" still had some legs, thanks to versions ...

EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Swingin' With Bing: Bing Crosby's Lost Radio Performances

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Bing Crosby Swingin' With Bing: Bing Crosby's Lost Radio Performances Shout! Factory 2004

There's a well-known photograph from the early 20th century of a middle-class family huddled around a radio listening to one of the many programs that provided entertainment then. We laugh at this picture today, recognizing that the electronic device that captivates its audience in the picture was replaced by television, and what passed for entertainment was changed forever. But for the period of time dominated by radio, Bing ruled the airwaves. In the mid-40s one third of the U.S. population tuned ...



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