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Interviews

Lauren Kinsella: In Between Every Line

By Published: March 5, 2013
The concept of the never-ending composition has echoes as old as jazz itself, from pianist/bandleader Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
1899 - 1974
piano
to one of the great modern re-shapers of his material, guitarist/composer Bill Frisell
Bill Frisell
Bill Frisell
b.1951
guitar
. "You can expand, contract, add ideas, and you can play the piece in many ways. I am learning this as we gig the music from the album," says Kinsella. "Each gig, the songs are slightly different, and it's having the space to explore this with already-written material on stage. That's when it gets really interesting.



"Composition is a process that works well under guidelines and tasks that you set yourself once the initial idea is born. This process is constantly being revised as you learn more about music and about yourself and about how you want to express something and for what reason. It sounds very vague, but actually it's extremely specific.

"With My Guess, sometimes a rhythmic idea came first, other times it was a melody, other times a piece of text I had written or read. And then things began to emerge, and the pieces formed. With 'Celia' or 'Malin's Chai,' I was initially thinking about a specific person or place, and that drove the composition forward. 'Malin's Chai' I wrote in Sweden. At the time, I was hanging out with some lovely players, and the words and the music all came from one or two evenings of tea, chats, little jam sessions and a sunset. 'Celia' I wrote to pay homage to a lady who I was very close to for my whole life. She died, and it was my way of communicating this loss. The music reflects my time with her as a child growing up and the great influence she had on me."

The one song not written by Kinsella is drummer Simon Roth's lovely "Arrival/Departure." "It's often a favorite with the audience at gigs," says Kinsella. "Sometimes the listener just wants a beautiful song with words and music that they can attach a meaning to. It's a great gift to be able to give this to people. I love singing it. It's very introspective and has strong imagery running throughout the text. When singing these words, they carry their own meaning for me. Sometimes I find it overwhelming when you think that each audience member will perceive your music differently, and it will conjure up thoughts, feelings and imagery completely unique to that person. That's immense and potentially very powerful."

Clearly, Kinsella gives a great deal of thought to the processes and disciplines involved in improvisation and composition alike, and for the singer the two are kissing cousins: "Sometimes people think that they're at two different ends of the spectrum, but they're actually a lot more closely related than you think. Any time that I improvise, it's spontaneous composition."

Part of Kinsella's improvising technique owes something to the study she undertook with singer R.A. Ramamani in India in 2006/7. A renowned singer and teacher of vocal improvisation at the Karnataka College of Percussion in Bangalore, R.A. Ramamani has collaborated with a number of jazz musicians over the years, including saxophonists Charlie Mariano
Charlie Mariano
Charlie Mariano
1923 - 2009
reeds
, Lennart Aberg and Iain Ballamy
Iain Ballamy
Iain Ballamy
b.1964
sax, tenor
, keyboardist Louis Banks, drummer Ranjit Barot
Ranjit Barot
Ranjit Barot

drums
, singer Maria Pia De Vito
Maria Pia De Vito
Maria Pia De Vito
b.1960
vocalist
and bassist Ronan Guilfoyle. Guilfoyle—who toured and recorded with R.A. Ramamani, as documented on Five Cities (Improvised Music Company, 2003)—is Director of the jazz department at Newpark Music Center, Dublin, where Kinsella was studying for a B.A. in jazz performance, and he provided the singer with a letter of recommendation.

"I stayed with her in the school for a couple of months," says Kinsella. "It was perfect for a musician; you could just sit in a room all day and practice. I didn't have a phone with me, I didn't have a computer—I was very much focused on singing scales. Everything she showed me I am able to use in jazz, as an improvising tool and as a method for practicing scales. You take a raga in Southern Indian music, and it would have a particular intervallic structure, and you base a rhythmic exercise on the intervals. In jazz, you can look at modes in that way. For example, if I was looking at the dominant chord, I would apply the same rhythmic exercise that she showed me over that scale."

Kinsella has no doubts that her study of Southern Indian Karnatic music theory with R.A. Ramamani influences her singing today. "Absolutely. I think anywhere an artist spends time practicing, it feeds back into what they're producing, sometimes in subtle ways, like how I improvise, how I might bend a note, and other times in more concrete ways like writing a tune based on a scale. It was a very peaceful time and a very productive time," says Kinsella, reflecting on her experience in Bangalore.


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