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Interviews

Sara Serpa: A Musical Journey

By Published: January 29, 2013
Carmen McRae—Bittersweet (Koch, 1964) Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong—Ella & Louis (Verve, 1956) Silke-Thora Matthies and Christian Kohn—Brahms Four Hand Piano Music Vol. 4 Ein Deustches Requiem (Naxos, 1999) Tom Jobim—Matita Perê (Polygram, 1973) Sarah Vaughan—Live at Mr. Kelly's (Emarcy, 1957) Pixies—Come On Pilgrim (4AD, 1987) Farafina—Fasco Denou (Real World, 1993) Miles Davis—Nefertiti (Columbia, 1968) Charlie Haden
Charlie Haden
Charlie Haden
b.1937
bass, acoustic
The Golden Number (A&M, 1977) Ran Blake—Wende (Owl, 1976) Deerhoof—Deerhoof vs. Evil (Polyvinyl, 2011) Paul Motian
Paul Motian
Paul Motian
1931 - 2011
drums
, Joe Lovano
Joe Lovano
Joe Lovano
b.1952
saxophone
and Bill Frisell
Bill Frisell
Bill Frisell
b.1951
guitar
Sound of Love (Winter & Winter, 1995) Béla Bartók}}— Bartók Plays Bartók (Pearl, 1995} Milton Nascimento
Milton Nascimento
Milton Nascimento
b.1942
guitar
Milton (EMI, 1970) Abbey Lincoln—Straight Ahead (Candid, 1961) Thelonious Monk
Thelonious Monk
Thelonious Monk
1917 - 1982
piano
Quartet with John Coltrane—Live at the Five Spot (Blue Note, 1958) Meredith Monk
Meredith Monk
Meredith Monk
b.1943
vocalist
Impermanence (ECM, 2008) Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
1899 - 1974
piano
Piano Reflections (Capitol, 1953) Johann Sebastian Bach—The Art of the Fugue

AAJ: What were your experiences coming from Lisbon to Boston and then to New York? If so how did those experiences impact your artistic development?

SS: It's very hard to describe my experiences coming from Portugal to the USA. Just try to imagine coming from a small school in Lisbon, that doesn't have more than 200 students, to Berklee, where you have 4,000 students from all over the world. And to be alone for the first time in a foreign country, with the ideal of studying music. With tough winters in Boston...and then going to NEC where I met wonderful teachers who really encouraged me and supported my music, like Danilo Pérez, Dominique Eade and Ran Blake. This all meant an opening of my mind, beyond what I could imagine. I was able to explore and work hard on my music, in a really focused way. And learn even more about jazz, from direct sources.

And then New York, where there are so many musicians, so many people, and where the scene is so competitive. And then you have to pay your bills, you have to keep working on your music, it's like a positive struggle. It taught me that nothing is for granted, and if you really want something to happen, it has to come from you and not from others. And there are so many incredible musicians in this city that inspire me and teach me every day. To be in New York helped me to see things in a different perspective. The goal is just to keep doing the music I love, be a better musician and person.

AAJ: Your debut album, Praia, contains intriguing original compositions, presumably inspired by Cape Verdean themes, what is your connection to Cape Verde?

SS: I wonder why you ask me about Cape Verde, as there's nothing related to it on that record. Praia means "beach" in Portuguese, and it was what I missed the most during my first years in Boston, and that feeling gave some impulse composing that music. Those songs were my first attempts of writing music, and they had a stamp on it, which was "I miss my home, I miss my friends, but I also love my new life here."

AAJ: It is quite interesting and unique that your compositions on Mobile reflected the spirit of literary works yet your singing was primarily wordless vocalese. What inspired you in those particular eclectic mix of books?

SS: It was very random. A few months after moving to New York I realized I was only reading books from travelers and adventurous people, about travelers' struggles, about discovering the unknown. And maybe that was related with what I was experiencing, being in NY and finding my way of living in this city. Each book was a revelation for me, and I loved reading all of them. And I thought that maybe I could try to recreate a scene or a memory from each book into music. I was fortunate to be able to explore this music with [guitarist] Andre Matos
Andre Matos
Andre Matos

guitar
, [pianist] Kris Davis
Kris Davis
Kris Davis

piano
, [bassist] Ben Street
Ben Street
Ben Street

bass
and [drummer] Ted Poor
Ted Poor
Ted Poor

drums
, as I think they really understood each song and played it beautifully.

AAJ: Currently you perform leading your own group as well as in duos either with Ran Blake
Ran Blake
Ran Blake
b.1935
piano
or André Matos. What are the different challenges inherent in each setting?

SS: For the duo setting, there are similar aspects that need to be present: communication, good time, listening, and empathy. We have to be a team.


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