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Live Reviews

Guelph Jazz Festival: Guelph, Canada, September 5-9, 2012

By Published: September 23, 2012
ROVA's Electric Ascension followed a few hours later, and its approach was complimentary and opposite. The ensemble took inspiration from the original structure and moved through the group sections with the aid of hand signals, delivered by either Jon Raskin or Larry Ochs. The backline opened the proceedings before being joined by the front line for the opening group section. The evening was then spent rotating through smaller units with only a handful of group collaborations. The group's performance was slower and mellower than the original, but it was refreshing to watch the small subsets interact. The ensemble was driven by Drake's drumming and Mazurek's playing was especially fiery.

Huntsville with Nels Cline and Glenn Kotche

There is a town a few hours north of Guelph called Huntsville, a cottage enclave for those that can run away from their homes over the summer. So, the appearance of the Norwegian trio by the same name was greeted with the image of people lounging on deck chairs, roasting marshmallows. However, none of that was in sight when the trio—guitarist Ivar Grydeland, bassist Tonny Kluften and percussionist Ingar Zach—walked onstage with Nels Cline and Glenn Kotche. This lineup is a reunion of the 2007 concert released as one disc of Huntsville
Huntsville
Huntsville

band/orchestra
's two-disc set, Eco, Arches, & Eras (Rune Grammofon, 2009).

The show began with a simple bass introduction from Kluften and then the layers of riffs and loops in rhythmic sync began. The two guitarists and bassist all had a variety of effect pedals to increase the textures and timbres, while Kotche (who, again, had a laptop with him) and Zach had a variety of small percussion on hand to augment their full kits.

The variety of Cline's sonic explorations is well documented, and Grydeland matched him—though he was progressed through the jam by addition and subtraction, as opposed to Cline's approach, which based more on variations of a given sound. Kotche played more "drummerly" than on the previous night, while Zach demonstrated, at times, a The Necks
The Necks
The Necks

band/orchestra
-like ability to lock in a groove. The evening's single improv turned into a 90-minute piece that never lagged.

Colloquium

The music portion of the festival is only half the story. The GJF is unique in North America in that a three-day academic colloquium runs in tandem. The colloquium is presented by the ICASP—the Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice research project—with the goal being to present papers which show the impact improvisation can have on justice, social change, and pedagogy. The ICASP's home is the University of Guelph and that campus hosts the colloquium and several festival shows.

The colloquium theme this year was "Pedagogy & Praxis"—and under that banner academics and fans assembled to hear findings on Gil Scott-Heron
Gil Scott-Heron
Gil Scott-Heron
1949 - 2011
vocalist
, the impact that school-based improvisation programs have on at-risk youths, and whether improvisation can be taught. Workshops and concerts punctuated the talks—one notably was hands-on, based on exercises from John Steven's Search & Reflect (Community Music, 1985).

The Wednesday keynote speaker was Professor Jesse Stewart. Stewart has a long connection to the University of Guelph and he outlined his formative years as well as what, and how, he teaches students at Carleton University in Ottawa. He provided examples of how his collaborative ensembles have created and played instruments out of paper or balloons.

On Thursday, it was Professor David Ake, from University of Nevada at Reno, who talked about how he, as a jazz educator, and his students struggle with musical categories both from the point of what to teach but also who to include. The number of notable "jazz" players that have pronounced that they don't play jazz or that jazz is dead—from drummer Max Roach
Max Roach
Max Roach
1925 - 2007
drums
to trumpeter Nicholas Payton
Nicholas Payton
Nicholas Payton
b.1973
trumpet
—is long; the question arises, if they themselves renounce the title of "jazz," should they be taught in a jazz program? And how does the acceptance of labels shape a players education and self-definition? Ake's stance is that the word "jazz" is like the word spaghetti—multiple strands, some are more attached then others, and all-in-all rather messy.

Friday morning began with an interview with Fred Frith
Fred Frith
Fred Frith
b.1949
guitar
. Frith's reputation a guitarist is without question—Henry Cow, Art Bears, Massacre, Naked City, numerous recording under his own name—are all testimony to his relentless progression and inventiveness. But since 1997 he was been a member of the music faculty at Mills College and is mentoring, teaching, and shaping many of the next generation of creative musicians. In his interview, he recounted how he got involved in teaching, the challenges in teaching improvisation in an environment that expects accountability, the expectations of students, and how his own background shapes how he approaches students.


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