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Opinion/Editorial

Radio Killed the Roneo Star?

By Published: July 27, 2012
Every single opportunity to use any telecommunications technology or any approach that was ever available is—of course!—still available in the Digital Age. New and improved developments have arrived, too, beyond anyone at Cumulus' wildest dreams, apparently. But—no longer a way to return to Eden, no longer a chance to repair the damage and wasted opportunities and make it all succeed again? Hardly. Not even close. The marvelous developments of the last 20 years are more available for use than ever before.

Get ready. Market corrections are never easy. Sometimes they're fun.

Did Video kill the Radio Star?

Did Internet kill the Video Star?

Will Something Else kill the Internet Star?

These questions and many others will be answered on the next episode of Soap.

Unfortunately, ABC Television cancelled the Soap series in 1981. More importantly, many of the principal actors have died or retired, or have been brought out of retirement to MC the annual Academy Awards broadcast. If another episode of Soap ever airs, I'll be one of the very few people who see it. You'll likely miss the announcement and not even DVR it. So I'll just tell you what happens...

Life continues. Civilization is not wiped out, not for quite awhile. KABC stays on the air and due to Doug McIntyre's ratings, lets him play jazz occasionally and signs him to a lifetime contract. There is so much money in Hollywood that they never stop making movies, even at times when they should. Nothing kills the internet because, in fact, it is not alive. Like a virus, it has no intelligence and is entirely animated by its host—mankind—which is the problem, and solution. Apple rolls out roughly twenty more versions of the iPhone, each more impressive than the last, while Japanese and Korean phone designers scramble to keep up (Blackberry is long gone, of course). Bicycles and streetcars make a big comeback as forms of transportation in all the major cities of the world. The United States Postal Service maintains Saturday delivery and is not privatized, because everyone wants the service but nobody wants the problem. Some new guy becomes president, then a woman is finally elected to the office. NPR remains on the air. Jazz lives.

Photo Credits

Page 1: Top, courtesy OfficeMuseum.com

Page 1: Bottom, courtesy of Harald Bohne

Page 2: Bruce Dixon

Page 3: "His Master's Voice," by Francis Barraud


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