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Live From New York

Arrington De Dionyso, Mary Halvorson, Liturgy, Sightings, Peter Brotzmann & Pulverize The Sound

By Published: July 2, 2011
When, finally, the German took a rest, his New York heirs rose up in a frenzy of choreographed noise, composed in a fashion that suggested the end results on an improvisation. Breathless head-banging riffs took on the light steps of precise arrangement, as trumpeter Peter Evans, bass man Tim Dahl and drummer Mike Pride
Mike Pride
Mike Pride

percussion
made their sonic assault. Initially, Dahl's excessively distorted (and ultra-trebly) electric bass seemed a touch too thin over heavy duration, but soon the ears adapted (or were driven into submission), and the pelting machine-gunning could be heard uninhibitedly. Evans switched between pure bugle-trilling and scuffed up-close bell-chundering. The trio's set was a thrill for both the guts and the ganglia.

Call me a traditionalist, but Brötzmann's greatest ascension of the evening was his more hell-raising quintet set. He partnered with fellow reed men Ken Vandermark
Ken Vandermark
Ken Vandermark
b.1964
saxophone
and Mars Williams
Mars Williams
Mars Williams
b.1955
saxophone
—the latter recalled as a member of The Waitresses—amounting to a barrage of equally adept racket-sculptors. Even though this pair often transcended the sonic limits, there were several occasions when Brötzmann lurked silently to the side, only to weigh in at an opportune moment with headlong blasts that were even greater than theirs; this was not your typical septuagenarian. Drummer Paal Nilssen-Love
Paal Nilssen-Love
Paal Nilssen-Love
b.1974
drums
was not as astonishingly intricate as usual, here depended upon to deliver a harder, less-detailed drive to ensure the group momentum. This was Brötzmann at his more predictable, but there was no finer way in which to climax this celebratory night. Anything less would have been an anti-climax.


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