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Book Reviews

The Da Capo Best Music Writing 2010

By Published: January 15, 2011
Today such writing may be more purveyor of perspective than point-or-service definition. From this point of view, four pieces pop to the surface giving universal treatment to Michael Jackson
Michael Jackson
Michael Jackson
1958 - 2009
vocalist
, Merle Haggard and Brad Paisley...if those are not strange bed fellows, then there is no such thing as "strange." Greg Tate's Village Voice tribute: "Michael Jackson: The Man in Our Mirror" and Jason King's "Michael Jackson: An Appreciation of His Talent" from Pass The Curve capture the immediate importance of Jackson to American music as well as his place the in the cultural freak hall-of-fame already inhabited by Fatty Arbuckel, Charlie Chaplin, Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
1935 - 1977
vocalist
, and soon-to-be Tom Cruise. Haggard, in Jason Fines's "The Fighter: The Life and Times of Merle Haggard" (Rolling Stone) emerges as the consummate survivor, with Willie Nelson—icons in no need of cultural redemption. Robert Christgau's take on Brad Paisley on the Barnes and Noble website demonstrates amply why he is "the Dean of Rock Journalism."

Similar are two juxtaposed treatments of hip hop at light-speed: Lola Ogunnaike's introduction the the Lil Wayne-generated phenom, Drake (current reigning king of hip hop) in "Drake: Rookie of the Year" published in The Vibe and Philip Mlynar's "50-Cent: One Dethrowned King Out to Reclaim His Crown" from Hip Hop Connection. Ogunnaike's article is a snapshot at the top, where Drake currently finds himself and Mlynar's illustrates just how fleeting fame becomes in the rap world as it was not so long ago that 50 Cent was king, with Kanye West and Lil Wayne kings leading up to Drake. Only Eminem seems resistant to this hyperspace evolution.

In the area of straight reportage, Eugene Holley, Jr.'s "One on One with Maria Schneider" from PMP: The Annual Magazine of the Philadelphia Music Project is a splendidly candid interview with one of the brightest minds in contemporary big band, where Schneider was not afraid to take on "Testosterone" big band theory in the face of her carefully crafted charts. Mark Swed's "Conducting 101" in Los Angeles Times captures conducting enfant terrible Gustavo Dudamel steering the Gothenburg Symphony through "this crazy opera," Verdi's Requiem on his way to his post at the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Alex Ross provides The New Yorker with "Marian Anderson: Voice of the Century," shining much deserved light on that voice.

Social commentary disguised as music writing provides for the most compelling writing in the collection. Michelle Tea's "The Gossip Take Paris," published in The Believer follows the fabulously fat and militantly gay Beth Ditto ("another feminist punker from Arkansas," how many are there?) on the streets of Paris. Tea's article is less about music than it is the Euro-cultural icon/anti-icon that Ditto represents in sophisticated Western Europe; her Horatio Alger-ness of Ditto sounding disingenuous.

Hua Hsu's "The End of White America" from The Atlantic is a dirt sandwich of an article that begins with the perfectly true supposition that we stand before post- white America and ends with "race as cultural fiction" clung to for a sense of place. In between is an absurd discussion of "Whiteness" cultural studies emerging in the academy, as if the first three-hundred years of higher education in America was not enough to define "Whiteness." Hsu quotes Temple University sociologist Matt Wray, who contends that his white students believe they are culture-less:

"White students are plagued by a racial-identity crisis: 'They don't care about socioeconomics; they care about culture. And to be white is to be culturally broke. The classic thing white students say when you ask them about who they are is, "I don't have a culture.' They might be privileged, they might be loaded socioeconomically, but they feel bankrupt when it comes to culture...They feel disadvantaged, and they feel marginalized. They don't have a culture that is cool or oppositional."

Grow up white, German-Catholic and in the American South and that statement seems derived more from the idleness of wealth and its contrived trappings and less from experiencing the culture on the ground.

Finally, Raquel Cepeda's "Another TKO: Teens Grapple with Rhianna vs. Chris Brown" in The Village Voice reveals a troubling future as junior high school girls side with Chris Brown in the couple's much publicized bout of domestic battery. The young critics reason that Rhianna was asking for the beating he gave her. That should keep gender-studies specialists busy into the next decade.

And all of this in the name of music.


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