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Live Reviews

Danilo Perez Trio Meets Thelonious Monk: Live at the Kimmel Center

By Published: November 25, 2010
During the post-intermission rap between Perez, Carrington, and Patitucci. Perez pointed out that Carrington started out young, coming up in the so-called Boston drum school that included Roy Haynes
Roy Haynes
Roy Haynes
b.1926
drums
and Tony Williams
Tony Williams
Tony Williams
1945 - 1997
drums
, and working with the likes of Oscar Peterson
Oscar Peterson
Oscar Peterson
1925 - 2007
piano
. Patitucci expressed gratitude for what he had learned in extensive conversations with Perez regarding Latin music (Perez does not like that term, preferring nomenclature like "Afro-Cuban"), noting rhythmic differences between various Caribbean and South American countries that are frequently bypassed by uninitiated players.

Perez indicated that he himself was partly inspired early on by Wynton Marsalis
Wynton Marsalis
Wynton Marsalis
b.1961
trumpet
, who insightfully told him that musically, "New Orleans is the northern end of the Latin countries." Perez said, laughing, that, on his first exposure to Monk's music through the auspices of Jon Hendricks
Jon Hendricks
Jon Hendricks
b.1921
vocalist
, "I didn't like it at all!" But with the help of Monk-inspired Steve Lacy
Steve Lacy
Steve Lacy
1934 - 2004
sax, soprano
, he grew to love Monk's use of augmented intervals and his ability to write in voices rather than chords.

Following the intermission, the group performed Perez's own "Panamonk," calling it "a very challenging piece," which included frequent shifts into diverse rhythms of both the Latin and straight-ahead variety, and where the influence of Bud Powell
Bud Powell
Bud Powell
1924 - 1966
piano
and Herbie Hancock
Herbie Hancock
Herbie Hancock
b.1940
piano
could be heard in Perez's playing. "Straight, No Chaser" was brilliantly arranged and performed, while "Round Midnight" consisted of a beautiful piano solo with Bill Evans
Bill Evans
Bill Evans
1929 - 1980
piano
' impressionist influence shining through, and shades of Oscar Peterson as well. The set ended with "Think of One" and "Ask Me Now," building towards a climactic top-heavy salsa flavor. An encore of "Evidence" and "Four in One" emphasized Monk's stride rhythms, as if to thank him for the inspirations.

This and two upcoming "Jazz Up Close" concerts in December, 2010 and April 2011, are dedicated to Monk's influence. They are part of an ongoing series of concerts, curated by Perez over several years, which have provided some of the highest level performances heard in the Philadelphia area during that time. Perez deserves much credit for his creative force in organizing the series.

Photo Credits:

Linda Braceland


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