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DVD/Video/Film Reviews

When You're Strange: A Film About The Doors

By Published: September 4, 2010
But as much as When You're Strange does nothing to sugarcoat Morrison's various abuses, it also shows just how charismatic the singer could be when he was "on." More importantly, however, it brings attention to the talents of the rest of the group: Krieger, the songwriter and unorthodox rock guitarist; Manzarek, the sonic and organizational anchor; and John Densmore, a drummer with a predilection for jazz but an equal allegiance to rock energy and rhythm.



With so much iconic music—the kind of music that many have not actively sought out to hear, but through films and radio remain completely familiar—The Doors' place in rock history is already cemented. When You're Strange: A Film About The Doors provides a concise and compelling window into The Doors' equally rapid ascent and descent, with the background of the 1960s (Robert Kennedy, Vietnam, Charles Manson) creating a visual and sociological context for a group that couldn't have emerged or succeeded at any other time. Director Tom Dicillo's wrapping conceit—an actor, clearly intended to be Jim Morrison, hitch-hiking and taking over a car—feels more than a little forced, but doesn't detract from the film's honesty and factual accuracy, painting a complete picture of The Doors for all its good...and all its bad.

Production Notes: 96 minutes. Extras: exclusive interview with Jim Morrison's father, Admiral George C. Morrisonm USN [Ret].

Photo Credits

Photos captured from When You're Strange: A Film About The Doors, courtesy of Eagle Vision


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