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Book Excerpts

Cecil Taylor at the Take 3, 1962-'63

By Published: July 24, 2010
In 1964, when I would be living with "Pretty," Albert came to the apartment several times to hang out and also to do an interview. The tape of that interview (and a tape of an interview with Betty Carter
Betty Carter
Betty Carter
1930 - 1998
vocalist
) was inside the Wollensak case when I was burglarized. I never got the chance to transcribe it.

Albert would die in 1970, apparently by his own hand. A year after that, in the process of moving to the West Village with Carolyn, I discovered a leather tie on the floor of the bedroom closet. It was caked in plaster dust, but I was able to make out the letters "AA" written in ink on the label. My first thought was, how the hell did this get here? Had Albert removed his tie while we talked and forgotten about it? Had "Pretty" found it and, for safekeeping, hung it in the closet where, forgotten by her as well, it had eventually been jostled from its hook? After a moment I realized that the circumstances behind the tie's appearance in my closet were probably not so innocent—and I could smile about it now. When I met her, "Pretty" had already "balled" every living entry in the Encyclopedia of Jazz and cohabiting with me had in no way discouraged her from moving on to the supplementary volume. Why not Albert?

Speaking of girl singers, I should note that in the course of Cecil's run a couple of remarkable vocalists, Jeanne Lee and Sheila Jordan
Sheila Jordan
Sheila Jordan
b.1928
vocalist
, work opposite him from time to time. Another performer who turns up (making his debut, as I remember it) is Tiny Tim. "What the fuck is this?" two people at separate tables exclaim in unison when he launches into "Tiptoe Through the Tulips."

I should also add that someone who doesn't show is Ornette. Eventually Ornette and Cecil will be acknowledged as the dual progenitors of the New Music, but they've been competing for sole ownership of this distinction from the start and, declarations of mutual respect aside, they aren't especially supportive of one another. Ornette, who's the better known of the two, clearly wants to protect his advantage. A few days after the "Monk and Taylor" column I'm walking on 8th Street, head down against a driving rain, when my path is suddenly blocked. I look up and it's Ornette.

"You must make a lot of money writing for that paper," he says and brushes past me.

So much for the parties at Ornette's loft.

[Author's Note: There'd been talk about Ornette and Cecil recording together since the late '50s, but nothing ever materialized. Around 2003, preparations for an album by them were actually underway when Ornette decided not to go ahead with the project.]

Just days before the gig will come to its conclusion, and determined to savor every last moment, I'm seated at a table right near the stage. The band has been "exchanging energies" for forty minutes. Each time the torrent of sound begins to ebb and you think, that's it, they're spent, they can't possibly have anything left, an apparently tossed-off phrase, a single note, reignites the process and the music builds to even greater levels of intensity than it had reached before. (Buell Neidlinger, who's here tonight, isn't going along at this point. He's stopped playing and he looks to be exhausted—or worse. Eyes closed, his glasses askew, his head is hanging over his bass at an alarmingly strange angle. Has he broken his neck?)

I'm facing straight ahead and totally absorbed in what's taking place, when Jack Kerouac bounds onto the bandstand in front of me. Appearing to be in a...well...beatified condition, he twice, and very slowly, makes a circle around the entire group. Then he walks between and around each of the individual players. Finally he bends down and slides under the piano where, lying on his back, he folds his arms across his chest. At the end of the piece (some twenty minutes later), he emerges from beneath the piano and extends his hand to Cecil.

"I'm Jack Kerouac," he says, "and I'm the greatest writer in the world." A startled Cecil (who at first isn't sure who this cat is and who'd apparently been unaware of his presence) recovers quickly. Accepting Kerouac's hand he says: "I'm Cecil Taylor and I'm the greatest pianist in the world."

Me, I'm thinking, Jesus, this is too much—it's way past too much. And though it occurs to me to say to them: "I'm Robert Levin and I'm the greatest 'person of artistic persuasion' in the world," that's just a reflex. I've got, right now, no need to say anything—certainly nothing bitter. No. If reflected glory turns out to be the best kind I'll get I'll take it. Right now my simple proximity to this is enough to make me feel like I'll live forever.


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