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Artist Profiles

Introducing Anthony Braxton

By Published: July 17, 2010
"Getting back to the music in the AACM," Braxton went on, "what's happening is that we're coming to realize that we have to bring all the different arts, all the different avenues, together. Music, painting, sculpting—they're all, in themselves, very limiting. We're working on getting to a wider spectrum with a label like 'art' or 'activity' or 'environment,' rather that 'music' or painting.' We want to incorporate as many different approaches and avenues as possible. We're working together in different kinds of groups with different kinds of approaches. We have pieces where each musician plays ten balloons. I have a piece in which I conduct four chairs and four shovels; another piece where an audience comes, the musicians play three blocks away, then someone comes to tell you the concert is over. Leo Smith wrote a lot of plays that we perform. All these different avenues are being covered.

"I mean we can all play on changes, and most of us could read music in a symphony orchestra. But we're really not concerned with that anymore. Sometimes I do it because I like that kind of music. But it's not about proving anything anymore.

"What's happening now can be seen as a logical reaction to the lies this country was built on. But this is not so much a revolution as it is a final curtain being drawn on a particular scene, and while the final curtain is being drawn, a curtain is opening on the next scene."

Although he was determined to stay in New York, to "meet musicians, hear music, go to art galleries and get into new avenues of expression," Braxton said that he'd found the scene here in many ways "depressing."

"The musician's here are so divided economically, because people who control things divide them that way. But they're also divided from a lot of other standpoints, and the music in relation to the people is not as strong as it could be. There's so much dissension here. I feel like what's needed here is some kind of organizing by the artists along the lines of the AACM. In New York musicians are so separated. It would be nice if we could get together some kind of orchestra and take it to different neighborhoods. I mean there are so many remarkable people walking around now creating music, whose music could reach out to all the people. But those in control won't let it get through to the public.

"There's been a conscious, plotted attempt to suppress and wipe out creative music in this country. I think you realize the significance of art in a culture and what the new art represents and who it threatens if people are able to hear it. It becomes a threat to existing values because it can expand things and stimulate people to change the existing state of things. This is dangerous to people for whom change is not an advantage, so it becomes very...interesting.

"Let me tell you how deep this thing is. When our first record came out on Delmark, it was put down immediately. Immediately. And what was strange, the jazz cats said it wasn't jazz and the 'classical' cats said it wasn't 'classical' music. The critics said it wasn't even music. One way they'd put it down, they'd use comparison to try to destroy the morale within the group—compare me to Roscoe, compare LeRoy to someone—and they would say, well, the conclusion is that this cat's better than that cat. That's a very good way to destroy unity, and that is what was done. Everybody in the group knew it, but we were not in a position to do anything about it. Like certain individuals—they know who they are—consciously exploited what we did and used it for something else."

Braxton was ready to split. "You know," he paused to say, "here I've been talking all this time about art and artists, but actually I've never really wanted to fully identify with the idea of being an 'artist,' or with the idea of playing music for a living. I'm afraid of being a 'musician' in the sense that society defines it—that is, of separating art from life, or of being in the music business. Art gets to be so manipulated. Like everybody's a potential artist—butchers, bakers...I think the whole idea of art is something that Western culture has introduced so that it can be used on evil trips. Like, Western music was originally just a toy for rich people, something for the king to talk shit about. I feel that potentially we all are the music; our lives are art in the purest sense. So I don't want to sell my music anymore than I want to sell my hands. It's very evident, just checking out the scene, that if you tamper with the music and turn it into a synthetic, then in fact you turn yourself into a synthetic. It's very hard to participate and not have that happen.


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