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Artist Profiles

Introducing Anthony Braxton

By Published: July 17, 2010
"But there are so many different types of music happening in the AACM. Chicago is a new center of the New Music. The atmosphere there seems to be more conducive to real creativity than New York's. Nobody's famous there and nobody's working, so if you're in music it's only because you love it.

"Each person is realizing the different things he can do—his capacity for creating in different areas. This is something that's just beginning—we've been practicing and working for three years now, but it's still just beginning. What's happening now is really just a stepping stone and a way of people getting their minds together. The music has just begun. That's why the AACM is so important, because it's given us the opportunity to study exactly what's been opened up by people like Cecil Taylor
Cecil Taylor
Cecil Taylor
b.1929
piano
, Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, and 'classical' composers like John Cage—to find out what will be the disciplines that we have to learn and what new avenues are available for the young musicians to explore."

I asked Braxton to elaborate on the classical influences in his music.

"I want to be able to make use of everything that's in the air," he said. "I want to arrive at a world art that takes in everything. Nobody can tell me that John Cage, or David Tudor playing Stockhausen (which I just heard the other day, and which knocked me out), is not my music. There are a lot of people contributing in classical music who I'm attracted to. I listen to classical music an awful lot and I'm very involved with it. Like, for me, John Cage is one of the two most important composers in the country today—the other is Duke Ellington. Cage's knowledge and use of so many different concepts, textures and properties have been a major contribution to music, and anybody who's in contemporary art has to know about them. Cage has done so much in terms of materials he's worked with and notions he's gone through—even the unsuccessful notions. And the fact that he's always trying to assimilate new concepts into the music, I find that very attractive.

"Of course there are a lot of things Cage hasn't come to terms with. His music is almost all intellectual, all conceptual. He's so conceptual that the only way you can really deal with him is through some kind of intellectual system. That's true of Stockhausen, too. Stockhausen (who is just the end of Webern) and Cage are like at the opposite polls of the same thing—Stockhausen with his empirical intellectualism, Cage with his metaphysical intellectualism. I met Cage once and we talked about this. I was telling him that when you look in this life you see trees and rocks, but you also see people—people exist, egos exist (in the sense that each person is coming from his own head), and if that's true then his music isn't reflecting nature as much as he thinks it is, because people are just as much a part of nature as rocks and trees.

"I'm also aware that Cage has put down black art. But that's something I overlook because that's something he has to deal with, not me, and I devote my attention to the positive things he's contributed. Actually, I think Cage, in regard to jazz, is starting to listen now and going through a period of change. He's been a victim of the scene, like everybody else; his inability to really expose himself to black art, to really be open to it and acknowledge it, has led him to a lot of wrong conclusions. But now I think he's becoming aware of the importance of black musicians, aware that he can learn from Cecil Taylor and Ornette Coleman.

"It's basically about improvisation. Nobody who walks into the next twenty years and calls himself a contemporary musician will be able to do it without having some understanding of what improvisation is all about in terms of the emotions behind it. Improvisation has been a property of world art—with the exception of Western art—for as long as this planet's been here. Most contemporary 'classical' musicians have now come to the juncture where they're starting to understand that they're going to have to know about Duke and Miles. If you don't know about them, you're missing some essential knowledge, because they've been through it gloriously.

"But I'm saying that in spite of themselves and their emotional deficiencies, people like Cage and Stockhausen have done so much. One thing for sure, the next stage of creativity will employ the gains that Cage has made, as well as the gains that black art has made. That much is undeniable.


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