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Artist Profiles

Introducing Anthony Braxton

By Published: July 17, 2010
In 1963, Braxton went into the army, spending most of his hitch in Korea. When he was discharged, in 1966, he met again with Jarman and Mitchell who were by then involved with the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, the cooperative of some thirty or forty musicians that is nearly four years old now. He began then to really get into Ornette, and Eric Dolphy
Eric Dolphy
Eric Dolphy
1928 - 1964
reeds
and John Coltrane
John Coltrane
John Coltrane
1926 - 1967
saxophone
, and to "stop playing like Paul Desmond." He also, during this period, got seriously turned on to classical music.

"One day I happened to put an Arnold Schoenberg record on by accident, and I almost passed out. So there was something else for me to check out. I was very much affected by Schoenberg, and he led me to other people like Berg and Webern and Stockhausen, and finally to John Cage."

Braxton was playing concerts with other AACM musicians by this time, and he also recorded two albums for Delmark—3 Compositions of New Jazz (1969) and a two-record set of alto solos, which was scheduled for release in late 1970. He also played on Richard Abram's Levels and Degrees of Light (1968).

In 1969 Braxton went to Europe with LeRoy Jenkins, Leo Smith and Steve McCall. He spent nearly a year there, working all over and recording two albums for BYG and Polydor. He also participated in an album of Alan Silva's on BYG, Luna Surface (Sunspots, 1969). While in Paris, Braxton met Ornette Coleman, who heard him play and invited him to come to New York. Braxton responded to the invitation and, with LeRoy Jenkins, got here early this spring and stayed with Ornette until he was able to get his own place. Of Ornette, Braxton says, "I've always loved him, loved and respected his music. And after getting a chance to meet and to know him, I'm thoroughly in awe of him, of the kind of person he is. He's been such a good friend. He has my deepest respect, musically and personally."

Despite Ornette's hospitality, the aforementioned concert, a gig with Chick Corea
Chick Corea
Chick Corea
b.1941
piano
and record dates with Corea and Marion Brown, Braxton hasn't had that easy a time of it in New York, though it's been no worse for him than for most New York musicians. He had, he told me, been looking for a day job, but without success.

We talked about the dismal economic realities of the scene and then Braxton began to discuss his music and what was happening with the Chicago players.

"When I got out of the army I joined the AACM and found everybody deep into exploring different avenues. Roscoe Mitchell talked of colors. Steve McCall was into shadings—he knows more about shadings, I think, than any other percussionist. Joseph Jarman, at the time, was into theater and getting politically involved; he was very concerned about the social aspects of what was happening in this country. Henry Threadgill was talking about healing through his music, and he was learning about different sounds and how these sounds affected people—like the relationship of one note to a particular illness. Richard Abrams was concerned with the spiritual aspects of music. So many different things were, and are, happening. If you talked to Leo Smith, he would talk to you about composition and about theater. LeRoy Jenkins, a master string musician, he's concerned with opening up avenues for the violin and arriving at different approaches. He wants to utilize the whole instrument without having someone call him a 'classical' violinist.

"I myself was into mathematics and philosophy, seeing music from a mathematical perspective and working with mathematical systems. I wanted to make up my own vocabulary because I didn't want to follow anybody else. I wanted to find my own avenues. Now my music is a combination of all I learned in the AACM plus what I was working with in mathematics in terms of sound relationships, densities, textures, different forms—what I call 'conceptual grafting,' which is about mixing different elements. I'm moving now toward trying to free the music in other ways, like playing in the streets and bringing carpenters and automobile mechanics into the music. I'm starting to see the music, and to me the notion behind the music is just as important as the music itself. I can see how in the next ten years or so everybody will be able to bring something into the music from whatever their occupation is. Like, you bake cookies? You make ice cream? Well, we'll find a way we can create with that.

"I've just finished a piece for one hundred tubas. I'd like to go to all the high schools and get all the tuba players and have a parade and go down to City Hall playing this piece. I want to make music that is socially usable and from which there can be direct results. Like, I dig watching shoemakers, watchmakers, ceramicists, work. I wish my art could be as useful as theirs is—I wish somebody could put tea or coffee in my music, or put their feet in it.


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