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Interviews

Don Aliquo: The Man, The Music, The Journey

By Published: July 26, 2010
I joined his group; it was a sextet consisting of Dewayne Dolphin, bass, Joe Barbato, piano, Delano Choi, trumpet, and Tony Campbell, alto. We were all about the same age and with Roger as our "straw boss." The gig was just a joy! We had regular gigs at the Too Sweet Lounge in Homewood and then the James Street Tavern on the North Side that were both so much fun. All of the cats that would come through the city would go there to sit in, including Eddie Harris
Eddie Harris
Eddie Harris
1934 - 1994
saxophone
[saxophone], Jimmy Owens
Jimmy Owens
Jimmy Owens
b.1943
trumpet
[trumpet], Dave Liebman
Dave Liebman
Dave Liebman
b.1946
saxophone
[saxophone], and Pittsburgh legends like Stanley Turrentine
Stanley Turrentine
Stanley Turrentine
1934 - 2000
sax, tenor
[saxophone] and George Benson
George Benson
George Benson
b.1943
guitar
[guitar, vocals]. That was a great time for me. I learned a ton!

AAJ: Would you say that coming up, you paid your dues by playing the small jazz clubs which used to be called the "chitlin circuit"—those small "back-alley" clubs which nurtured many a talent?

DA: I can remember George Heid [a jazz drummer and recording studio owner in Pittsburgh] talking about the real "chitlin circuit" of the past. According to him, my generation missed a lot of it. I do remember, however, all sorts of jazz activity in the black sections of the "'Burgh," especially as a very young man. Clubs like the Crawford Grill, the Crescendo, the Pyramid, Eileen's Zebra Room, and the Too Sweet Lounge were places where people were always playing. Of course, this is only a partial list! There were also a lot of places with jazz in other neighborhoods as well. Places like Lou's and the Encore, and later the Balcony in Shadyside, Walt Harper's various clubs, the Living Room in the South Hills—the list could go on and on. I am sure I made a pest of myself in every one of them, trying to play the music! (And often, I might add, not very well!) I am also sure people like organist Gene Ludwig and my Dad gigged in every one of them!

Basically, I think I caught the tail end of an extremely great jazz club scene in Pittsburgh. I had the opportunity to hear so many great players who were passing through in the clubs—people like Eddie Harris and Jimmy Owens. I remember my Dad taking me to hear [drummer and band leader] Chico Hamilton
Chico Hamilton
Chico Hamilton
1921 - 2013
drums
's group with Arthur Blythe [saxophone] when I was about 14. Man, I was just blown away not only by the music, but the whole scene! I also remember him taking me to hear Arnie Lawrence who was playing with a varitone [electric saxophone] at that time! Speaking of the varitone, I also heard Sonny Stitt
Sonny Stitt
Sonny Stitt
1924 - 1982
saxophone
twice in clubs in Pittsburgh. I remember him giving a young cat who wanted to sit in a hard time. He asked him, "How many keys are on the saxophone?" Of course everyone sat there and tried to figure that one out! He wouldn't let the guy play until he got the answer he was looking for. The second time, he asked for requests. I guess I was probably around 18 or 19, and I shouted back: "A Night in Tunisia." Then he shot back to us, "You ever been to Tunisia?" Then he proceeded to play the pop song "Mr. Bo Jangles" which to this day really cracks me up!

I remember playing in a concert with David Liebman at the Manchester Craftmen's Guild many years ago. After the concert I took him to the Too Sweet Lounge to jam with Roger Humphries. I will never forget what he said: "Man, neighborhood clubs like this don't exist anymore! This is incredible!" At that time, I didn't realize how right he was. Many of those clubs I've already mentioned were filled with the people of the neighborhood who loved hanging out with each other and were super supportive of the music and the musicians.

What I really remember and marvel at is how both the musicians and the patrons consistently gave me much love and encouragement in all the clubs. And I wasn't the only one. The sad thing for me as a teacher is the knowledge that my students don't have the same opportunities to be embraced and nurtured not just by fellow musician mentors and teachers, but by the whole community. Man, I was blessed!

AAJ: At any point in your career, were you able to sustain a living solely by playing the music only?


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