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Live Reviews

Miri International Jazz Festival, May 14-15, Malaysia, Borneo

By Published: June 3, 2010

The complex rhythms, the unison playing between Tohpati's guitar and keyboard, and the atmospheric sound effects create a rich and dense sound, and the band always travel with their own sound engineer to ensure the mix is just right. The music and the mix was obviously appealing, as by the middle of the performance the area in front of the stage was a jungle of umbrellas as the rain continued to fall, though with less conviction than before.

The closing "Unfaded Hopes" was a slow piece in sharp contrast to the other numbers. This melancholy- tinged composition featured a fine extended solo from Tohpati, who rang Pat Metheny

Pat Metheny
Pat Metheny
b.1954
guitar
-like lines from his strings, softly as in a ballad at first and growing slowly to soar freely before returning to the beautiful melody, all the while accompanied by gently supportive kendang and gamelan. It was an emotive conclusion to the set. SimakDialog means "listen carefully to the dialogue" and what a wonderful dialogue it was.

A recurring topic of discussion in the press conferences at the start of each day and a subject of debate among the music journalists covering MIJF '10 was: what constitutes jazz these days? As the music spreads ever further around the globe, absorbing the rhythms and instruments of other nations—as indeed it has always done—it is a question which is becoming harder to answer, not that it was really ever that easy. Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
1899 - 1974
piano
described his music as being in a constant state of becoming, which hints at the essence of jazz. He also suggested doing away with the term "jazz" as long ago as the 1920s, suggesting it be called Negro music, a moniker which obviously never stuck. Charles Mingus
Charles Mingus
Charles Mingus
1922 - 1979
bass, acoustic
described his music as "Mingus music," and Ahmad Jamal
Ahmad Jamal
Ahmad Jamal
b.1930
piano
refers to jazz as "American Classical Music." John Coltrane called it "universal music." Clouding the issue further still, Miles Davis announced in one of his final print interviews: "Jazz is dead."

So where does that leave us? Jazz is a myriad of styles from ragtime of the 1890s right up to the fusions of this decade. All the styles that have evolved over the last one hundred and twenty years have depended heavily on each other and borrowed liberally from the existing vocabulary. No wonder jazz is a difficult word to define; jazz is different things to different people. What is clear is that jazz is no longer the sole preserve of America; to suggest otherwise would be analogous to saying football is an English game. Jazz, like football is out there—it belongs to everybody. Maybe Eugene Ang from Mellow Motif was right when he stated: "I feel the question is irrelevant."

Nobody however, would have argued that the music of pianist Amina Figarova's sextet was anything other than jazz. Having studied classical piano in her native Azerbaijan, she moved to Europe and is now based in Holland where she has spent the last ten years leading a sextet which interprets her original compositions.

The opening number erupted in double time, with trumpeter Ernie Hammes and then Figarova taking exciting solos which spared nothing. The driving rhythm at the heart of the music, courtesy of bassist Sven Happel and animated drummer Chris "Buckshot" Strik was infectious. Flautist Bart Platteau, who impressed throughout the set, took a vivacious solo brimming with ideas which brought the sextet back to the head and out.

Figarova's compositions are characterized by dynamic, propulsive rhythms, orchestral passages with an inherent melodicism, and impassioned soloing. The three-pronged front line of flute, trumpet and Johannes Meuller's tenor introduced the melody in most of the numbers, sounding as one voice. Figarova for her part mixes up a slightly percussive approach to the keys with a free flowing lyricism. On "Breakfast for the Elephants" she spun an attractive extended solo which visited the entire range of the keyboard with only bass and drums for company. Drummer Strik is one of the most talented drummers in Europe; an absolute bundle of energy, he stoked the engine of the band with his insistent rhythms and inventive prodding and cajoling which endeared him to the crowd. His drumming using just his hands on "Look at That" was visually and sonically impressive.


Amina Figarova



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