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Interviews

David S. Ware: Gravitation

By Published: June 10, 2010
"This horn is made for me. I love the clarity of it, the high pitch, the sound of this particular horn. They've [each horn] all got a different sound." At the moment, Ware is concentrating mostly on the sopranino. "I have to get into the horn, to learn. It takes some practice. You've got to stay on it every day. I did that on the flute. On Great Bliss (Silkheart, 1990), I had only been playing for three months when I recorded the flute on those albums. At some point, you have to say it's ready enough. You always continue to progress. Right now, I feel that my sopranino playing is twice as good as it was in March. That's what you get when you practice."



The new trio lineup, with Parker and Smith, marks a return to the format that Ware used when he first started his own band, before expanding to his more familiar quartet shape. "It's powerful; it's totally spontaneous. There are nine pieces and the longest is maybe 15 minutes. I'm playing three horns. We went in the studio and hit it, because we all know this language. We don't need a rehearsal. We've been rehearsing forever. The time for rehearsal has passed. I hadn't played in a trio since the late '80s. Warren's playing tympani and trap drums. That's a little different. Every time I make a record, there should be something different. It should not be a repeat of what you've done before."

Even so, Ware prefers a stable band lineup. "I've done a few things in the past, with cats that I didn't know and I hated it. On the surface it's working, but it's not working for me. It's a music thing."

He also views his work as a definite part of the jazz continuum. "When I started getting interested in jazz, it came from the radio. I had my Bozo The Clown radio and I'd turn it down real low after midnight and I'd hear Lester Young

Lester Young
Lester Young
1909 - 1959
saxophone
and all those cats. I started listening to Julian "Cannonball" Adderley
Julian
Julian "Cannonball" Adderley
1928 - 1975
saxophone
and here comes Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
b.1930
saxophone
. An older guy in the neighborhood gave me a foot stack of records and one of those was [John Coltrane
John Coltrane
John Coltrane
1926 - 1967
saxophone
's] Giant Steps (Atlantic, 1960). When I heard that, I don't know if I listened to any of the rest. Here comes Archie Shepp
Archie Shepp
Archie Shepp
b.1937
saxophone
, Pharoah Sanders
Pharoah Sanders
Pharoah Sanders
b.1940
saxophone
and Ornette On Tenor (Atlantic, 1962) and all these cats that I gravitated towards..."

Selected Discography

David S. Ware, Saturnian (Solo Saxophones, Vol. One) (AUM Fidelity, 2009)

David S. Ware Quartet, Live in Vilnius (No Business, 2007)

David S. Ware Quartets, Live In The World (Thirsty Ear, 2006)

David S. Ware, flight of i (DIW, 1991)

David S. Ware, Great Bliss, Vol. 1-2 (Silkheart, 1990)

Andrew Cyrille/Maono, Metamusicians' Stomp (Black Saint, 1978)

Photo Credit

Page 1: Luca D'Agostino

Page 2: Claudio Casinova



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