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Artist Profiles

Curtis Fuller: Motor City Messenger

By Published: December 1, 2008
While Davis was in the hospital, Fuller worked with fellow band member John Coltrane
John Coltrane
John Coltrane
1926 - 1967
saxophone
at Birdland and then in Philadelphia with Lee Morgan
Lee Morgan
Lee Morgan
1938 - 1972
trumpet
, later recording the legendary Blue Train album with the two. Upon returning to New York he was offered the job of filling in for Monk at the Five Spot while the pianist waited for his cabaret card. The trombonist put together a group with tenor saxophonist Benny Golson
Benny Golson
Benny Golson
b.1929
sax, tenor
. "It was supposed be for two months for Monk to get his police card and we stayed two years, damn near," he laughs. Working opposite the group was the Gerry Mulligan
Gerry Mulligan
Gerry Mulligan
1927 - 1996
sax, baritone
Quartet with Art Farmer
Art Farmer
Art Farmer
1928 - 1999
flugelhorn
. Fuller recorded prolifically throughout the rest of the decade with Golson and as a leader and sideman on his own. Farmer and Golson would later join forces to form the Jazztet and Fuller would be an important component of the band (which also featured a young McCoy Tyner), but would leave because of the lack of opportunities to perform his own music with the group.

There were also stints with Dizzy Gillespie
Dizzy Gillespie
Dizzy Gillespie
1917 - 1993
trumpet
, Lester Young
Lester Young
Lester Young
1909 - 1959
saxophone
, James Moody
James Moody
James Moody
1925 - 2010
reeds
and Quincy Jones
Quincy Jones
Quincy Jones
b.1933
producer
, but it was with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers that Fuller would reach the pinnacle of his career. "I ran into him all the time. He was always there checking, because Lee Morgan had put the bug in his ear," he recalls with obvious pride. "Miles, everybody had told him, JJ, everybody ...He just came to me one night, 'I want you in the band...You got any music? Tell me you write. Write a song, we're going into the studio next week." Fuller joined the group in June of 1961 and appeared on the Impulse Art Blakey!!!!! Jazz Messengers!!!!! record with Lee Morgan, Wayne Shorter
Wayne Shorter
Wayne Shorter
b.1933
saxophone
, Bobby Timmons
Bobby Timmons
Bobby Timmons
1935 - 1974
piano
and Jymie Merritt
Jymie Merritt
Jymie Merritt
b.1926
bass
, contributing the first of several classic compositions, "A la Mode," to the band's book. "Art gave me the chance; that was Art."

Fuller left the next day for a State Department tour. Blakey, in a rare example of leadership latitude, gave Fuller a short leave of absence, but when the trombonist tried to make the Russian leg of the excursion the drummer told him, "Well if you go, goddammit, don't come back here. You want to play with them motherfuckers, go!" Fuller wisely chose to rejoin the group, which would soon feature Freddie Hubbard
Freddie Hubbard
Freddie Hubbard
1938 - 2008
trumpet
, Cedar Walton
Cedar Walton
Cedar Walton
1934 - 2013
piano
and Reggie Workman
Reggie Workman
Reggie Workman
b.1937
bass
, going on to become one of the greatest, most celebrated bands in jazz history. The trombonist would be the last man to leave in 1965 and would frequently rejoin the group in the '70s for European tours and allstar reunions.

In the ensuing years he would lend his huge talents to many great groups, including tenures with Jimmy Heath
Jimmy Heath
Jimmy Heath
b.1926
sax, tenor
and Count Basie
Count Basie
Count Basie
1904 - 1984
piano
. In the '80s he toured extensively with the Timeless All Stars (featuring old band mate Cedar Walton, along with Harold Land, Bobby Hutcherson, Buster Williams and Billy Higgins) of which he says, "That was beautiful, that was my next best thing." At the same time he worked with the Paris Reunion Band and co-led a band, Giant Bones, with Kai Winding. After moving to Massachusetts in the late '80s he began teaching at Hartt College and the New England Conservatory. Serious health problems threatened his career in 1994, but through hard work he managed to regain his considerable abilities and continue his contributions to the music.

While he is still going strong, Fuller's legacy as one of the most influential trombonists in the history of jazz is already well established. "He's definitely one of the biggest influences on me," says Robin Eubanks
Robin Eubanks
Robin Eubanks
b.1955
trombone
, a fellow Jazz Messenger. "He has a lot of technique for sure; he plays fast... for trombone you're always wondering how cats can do that since it's usually seen as a limited instrument in terms of velocity and intensity... He was one of the people that proved you can get around the horn well and because he was on so many recordings he was one of the people that put the sound of the trombone in people's ears, in terms of people putting a band together what kind of instrumentation they're going to use."

Steve Turre
Steve Turre
Steve Turre
b.1948
trombone
, another former Messenger, remembers, "I met Curtis when I first came to New York with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Opening night he was there and he was very encouraging... We ended up becoming friends and he showed me a lot of little keys that opened the door in ways to flow on the horn. I don't know anyone who can swing the way that Curtis swings. His phrasing and rhythmic concept is the ultimate."

Steve Davis, the final trombonist in the Messenger lineage concurs. "From a trombonistic standpoint, just the sheer velocity with which he phrases is pretty much unparalleled by anybody. The way he combines technical acumen on the instrument with his natural feeling for the music and for improvisation is just incredible... when you hear Curtis play it's all heart and soul."

Selected Discography:


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