All About Jazz: The web's most comprehensive jazz resource

Serving jazz worldwide since 1995
All About Jazz: The web's most comprehensive jazz resource

New & Noteworthy

March 2006

By Published: March 8, 2006
2005

Here, two master Improvisers, violinist Malcolm Goldstein and pianist Masashi Harada veer off into some sort of transcendental improvising exposition. Encompassing fractured themes and lucidly conjured imagery the artists' toss caution to the wind during these multifaceted performances. Goldstein is an amazing improviser, as his violin often sounds like it is an extension of his body and soul. Ideally, attributes or notions of this nature would signify a pinnacle of artistic success, to varying degrees. He extracts an abundance of multihued sounds via innumerable techniques during these interlacing call/response type deconstructions and realignments. Harada is a strong foil with his pumping block chords and vocal chants. And as the title might infer, this is an improvisational foray that shines forth with organic overtones and an oscillating sense of the dynamic.

This Heat

This Heat

ReR Megacorp

2006

This is a newly issued remastering of archival material culled from this cutting edge trio's late-'70s and early-'80s output. The British band was ahead of its time. Superb musicians, they integrated John Cage-like theories into a spacey, progressive-rock sound. Along with elements of minimalism and injections of the macabre, the artists' multitasking abilities signify an intricately devised methodology. The distinct musical behavior of this relatively short-lived band is beyond comparison! And the experimental implementations transmitted here, surface as uncannily nouveau and irrefutably inviting. Sometimes bizarre ideas strewn together by like-minded teammates will click. In any event, these gents beat the odds. (Essential avant-rock.)

Quinsin Nachoff

Magic Numbers

Songlines

2005

This recent release serves as the first SACD that, played on my new and relatively high-end DVD/SACD unit. And while I wasn't expecting miracles, the results proved to be gratifying, namely with the glistening and rather capacious sonic attributes. Tenor/soprano saxophonist Quinsin Nachoff commingles lyrically-charged choruses atop the buoyant, four-member strings section. Topped off with 3-D like stereo separation, bassist Mark Helias and drummer Jim Black add some zip into the overall game-plan. On the flip side, this isn't a mellow third-stream engagement. On the contrary, Nachoff mans a tightly integrated ship, where the strings section offers more than simply providing ornamentation. But there's an uncanny splendor set forth, comprised of unswerving momentum and lush harmonies. Nachoff bridges the best of several jazz-drenched frameworks throughout a bevy of shrewdly developed harmonic encounters and up-tempo soloing endeavors.

Univers Zero

Live

Cuneiform

2006

Belgian Rock-In-Opposition acolytes Univers Zero sort of encapsulate its sound and climactically centered tactics on this wondrously recorded live set. In fact, this outing presents an all-encompassing picture of the band's unique characteristics. Spanning three decades, the sextet's horns-strings-keys-rhythms makeup is largely about melodic overtones coupled with driving pulses and complex time signatures. The sextet blends a radical approach to familiar progressive-rock musings with horns and strings that occasionally drive the rhythmic pulses with booming unison lines. There are gentle moments, especially when the artists merge delicate chamber passages with ethereal treatments. No doubt, this newly issued disc will stand as one of the ensemble's finest recorded documents to date.



comments powered by Disqus