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Jazz Primer

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By Published: December 9, 2004
DUKE JORDAN LIVE IN JAPAN (Steeplechase), reissued in a double CD. This is a great session IMHO, with Jordan in fantastic form. I believe I never heard him play with such stream of ideas, so much fire and a big amount of swing, in complete rapport with Wilbur Little (bass) and the great Roy Haynes (drums). Jordan play many of his originals (Jordu, Paula, Scotch Blues, No Problem, the moving Misty Thursday) and many more. This recording came from two Japanese concerts and the sound quality is incredible, we can hear and feel all the joy of the enthusiastic audience. Although Duke Jordan is overlooked by most people, he is one of my long standing favorites since the days he played on the unforgettable Charlie Parker quintet.

Barney Willen BARNEY (French RCA Victor)—a great live recording with Kenny Dorham (trumpet), Duke Jordan (piano), Bibi Rovere (bass) and Daniel Humair (drums). This is a weonderful session made in 1959 on a Parisian night club with Dorham, Willen and Jordan in top form. They play eight tunes, including LADY BIRD (Jordan play a gem of solo—he say more in his 3:30 minute improvisation than most players on piles of CDs), BESAME MUCHO, STABLEMATES, JORDU, ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE and three more. For those who believe that European drummers don't swing, they must hear Daniel Humair.


Date: 06-Nov-1998 06:14:22
From: Jos? Domingos Raffaelli ( jdr@musicshop.com.br )
Jonathan Kranz,

The TCB records are reissues from the long defunct Warwick label. One of them is titled SOUL OF JAZZ PERCUSSION, with many different groups. The Donald Byrd album originally was released in the name of another musician. I'm tracing this correctly to give you all details. Sorry, but wait a little more. Jos?


Date: 07-Nov-1998 15:32:08
From: F?lix-Antoine Hamel ( bhamel@pandore.qc.ca )
A record I play quite often and I enjoy a lot is Phil Woods' 1974 "MUSIQUE DU BOIS" on the Muse label, with Jaki Byard on piano, Richard Davis on bass and Alan Dawson on drums. I think Phil's 1968-1970 band European Rhythm Machine (with George Gruntz, Henri Texier and Daniel Humair) is also a very underrated band. Any 1960's Joe Henderson Blue Note album also can be recommended ("PAGE ONE," "OUR THING," "IN 'N' OUT," "INNER URGE" and "MODE FOR JOE"). Dexter Gordon is one of my favorite players and I think he is still underrated for the influence he had on the modern saxophonists (notably on John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins). I have his complete 60s Blue Note recordings ("GO!" and "OUR MAN IN PARIS" are my favorites), but I strongly recommand "HOMECOMING: LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD" (Columbia, 1976), mainly for the presence of the marvelous trumpeter Woody Shaw, who is still a very underrated player. Dexter's 1978 "GREAT ENCOUNTERS" is also very exciting for his "chases" with an other tenor great, Johnny Griffin. I'm glad someone else mentionned Thelonious Monk's "ORCHESTRA AT TOWN HALL," because it's also a record I enjoy very much and I think it deserves a wider recognition. Charles Mingus' "OH YEAH" (Atlantic, 1961) features Roland Kirk and Booker Ervin in great form and I still don't understand why this album (one of the most adventurous I've heard from Mingus) is still widely ignored.

Have a good (jazz) time! FAH


Date: 07-Nov-1998 15:33:56
From: F?lix-Antoine Hamel ( bhamel@pandore.qc.ca )
A record I play quite often and I enjoy a lot is Phil Woods' 1974 "MUSIQUE DU BOIS" on the Muse label, with Jaki Byard on piano, Richard Davis on bass and Alan Dawson on drums. I think Phil's 1968-1970 band European Rhythm Machine (with George Gruntz, Henri Texier and Daniel Humair) is also a very underrated band. Any 1960's Joe Henderson Blue Note album also can be recommended ("PAGE ONE," "OUR THING," "IN 'N' OUT," "INNER URGE" and "MODE FOR JOE"). Dexter Gordon is one of my favorite players and I think he is still underrated for the influence he had on the modern saxophonists (notably on John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins). I have his complete 60s Blue Note recordings ("GO!" and "OUR MAN IN PARIS" are my favorites), but I strongly recommand "HOMECOMING: LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD" (Columbia, 1976), mainly for the presence of the marvelous trumpeter Woody Shaw, who is still a very underrated player. Dexter's 1978 "GREAT ENCOUNTERS" is also very exciting for his "chases" with an other tenor great, Johnny Griffin. I'm glad someone else mentionned Thelonious Monk's "ORCHESTRA AT TOWN HALL," because it's also a record I enjoy very much and I think it deserves a wider recognition. Charles Mingus' "OH YEAH" (Atlantic, 1961) features Roland Kirk and Booker Ervin in great form and I still don't understand why this album (one of the most adventurous I've heard from Mingus) is still widely ignored.

Have a good (jazz) time! FAH


Date: 07-Nov-1998 17:36:51
From: Sherman Ferguson ( drumshop@earthlink.net )
This is addressed to Paul Abella. The bassists on"Now He Sings Now He Sobs" was not Dave Holland.It was Miraslav Vitous. And this also is one of my favorites!


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