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Jazz Primer

More Obscure Favorites

By Published: December 9, 2004
Date: 22-Oct-1998 16:17:15
From: Gary ( ilukrion@voicenet.com )
With all the great jazz that was put out in the 50's and 60's it is difficult to suggest a few of the "best" picks. here goes. 1. Kenny Dorham- Whistle Stop. If you ever find a copy on CD, GRAB it! You won't regret it. Bop at its best with Philly Joe Jones playing at his best. All star ensemble. 2. Chick Corea- Now He Sings, Now He Sobs. Beautiful trio jazz with loads of twists and turns to keep even the most casual listener captivated. All three players play an equal role in this recording. It may not leave your player for days. 3.Andrew Hill- Smokestack and Blackfire. Andrew has a very distinct style. The music has a definate jazz tradition but sometimes borders on new territories. 4. Roy Haynes- Out of the Afternoon. Roy will forever be one of the greats. The music is very strong and his solos mirror of the melody. This was my first exposure to Roland Kirk. This album is a favorate of many friends. 5. Joe Henderson- Mode for Joe. Bobby Hutcherson and Joe Chambers play on this album and give the rhythm section a lift. Not quite a straight ahead album. NOT avante Garde. Try it. 6. Jackie McLean- Destination Out! Very Textural approach. Bobby Hutcherson, Grachan Moncur III, Roy Haynes, Larry Ridley. A new direction then, it still sounds very fresh. The list is endless I would check out a few of these. Lee Morgan- Indeed! Herbie Hancock-Any BlueNote 60's Rec. Art Blakey and Jazz Msgrs.- All great look for players you know. Eric Dolphy John Coltrane- Blue Train Anything up to Cresent is safe. Miles Davis 50's Quintet is a great place to start move up an album at a time and look for albums done by his sidemen. Hank Mobley One of the most underrated sax players. Workout. Sonny Clark- Trio, Cool Struttin and Complete Quartets (actually released under Grant Green) Have fun listening


Date: 22-Oct-1998 16:19:05
From: Gary ( ilukrion@voicenet.com )
With all the great jazz that was put out in the 50's and 60's it is difficult to suggest a few of the "best" picks. here goes. 1. Kenny Dorham- Whistle Stop. If you ever find a copy on CD, GRAB it! You won't regret it. Bop at its best with Philly Joe Jones playing at his best. All star ensemble. 2. Chick Corea- Now He Sings, Now He Sobs. Beautiful trio jazz with loads of twists and turns to keep even the most casual listener captivated. All three players play an equal role in this recording. It may not leave your player for days. 3.Andrew Hill- Smokestack and Blackfire. Andrew has a very distinct style. The music has a definate jazz tradition but sometimes borders on new territories. 4. Roy Haynes- Out of the Afternoon. Roy will forever be one of the greats. The music is very strong and his solos mirror of the melody. This was my first exposure to Roland Kirk. This album is a favorate of many friends. 5. Joe Henderson- Mode for Joe. Bobby Hutcherson and Joe Chambers play on this album and give the rhythm section a lift. Not quite a straight ahead album. NOT avante Garde. Try it. 6. Jackie McLean- Destination Out! Very Textural approach. Bobby Hutcherson, Grachan Moncur III, Roy Haynes, Larry Ridley. A new direction then, it still sounds very fresh. The list is endless I would check out a few of these. Lee Morgan- Indeed! Herbie Hancock-Any BlueNote 60's Rec. Art Blakey and Jazz Msgrs.- All great look for players you know. Eric Dolphy John Coltrane- Blue Train Anything up to Cresent is safe. Miles Davis 50's Quintet is a great place to start move up an album at a time and look for albums done by his sidemen. Hank Mobley One of the most underrated sax players. Workout. Sonny Clark- Trio, Cool Struttin and Complete Quartets (actually released under Grant Green) Have fun listening


Date: 22-Oct-1998 18:53:13
From: Scott Mortensen
Here's a few of my favorites that are a bit obscure:

John McLaughlin, Extrapolation. McLaughlin's first record plays nothing like his later music with the Mahavishnu Orchestra and later solo work. John Surman's baritone sax is stunning and Tony Oxley's drumming is great also. I can't figure out why EVERYONE doesn't know about this record.

Jimmy Giuffre, 1961. ECM's reissue of two albums by Giuffre, Fusion and Thesis. Influential early chamber-style jazz that borders on free while never completely going there.

Booker Ervin, That's It. Booker's my pick for THE most underrated saxophonist. I discovered his music through Mingus' Live at Antibes, which, if you don't have, you should go buy immediately! Booker also played with Randy Weston, another underrated musician who seems to be finally getting his due. That's It is a solid example of Booker's distinctive hard-bop style.




Date: 23-Oct-1998 11:43:43
From: andr?s pascual
Pat Metheny Group: "quartet."


Date: 23-Oct-1998 21:54:55
From: Jim Lees ( ridlees@tbaytel.net )
I am fairly neophyte at all this, but I love hard bop, late 50's, early 60's and one I keep playing...

A study in Brown—Clifford Brown/Max Roach, clear, crisp, muscular, a pleasure




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