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Jazz Primer

More Obscure Favorites

By Published: December 9, 2004
Ask for the best 10 or 100 albums of all time and you'll get the usual suspects: Kind of Blue, Saxophone Colossus, Armstrong's Hot Fives and Sevens, Jazz at Massey Hall, etc. Without a doubt, these albums have earned their acclaim and no collection would be satisfying without them. But what about the great, less well-known, even obscure albums? Don't we all have favorite albums that don't ever seem to make the top 100—yet always find their way to our turntables? Let's share our discoveries...

Date: 11-Oct-1998 09:34:35
From: Jonathan Kranz ( jonkranz@mediaone.net )


A few favorites of my own: Lucky Thompson, "Lucky Strikes" Bud Freeman and Bucky Pizzarelli, "Buck and Bud" Tommy Flanagan, "Tommy Flanagan Trio Overseas" Gene Ammons and Dodo Marmaroso, "Jugs and Dodo."


Date: 11-Oct-1998 12:15:27
From: Daniel Thouin ( dthouin@hotmail.com )


Ahmad Jamal:"Happy Moods,"Roy Haynes"We Three"(with Phineas Newborn&Paul Chambers),Lee Konitz"Motion,"Miles Davis"Filles de Killimanjaro,"Shirley Horn "Loads of love"&"With Horns," Yannick Rieu"In the myth."Those albums are all great on their own terms and each of thems have an uncommon freshness feeling.


Date: 11-Oct-1998 12:33:04
From: Michael Ricci ( coolcat@visionx.com )


Love this topic Jonathan! This *is* a super way for everyone to get insight into great music we might otherwise have missed.

I find myself coming back to these when I want to kick back and relax:

* Lee Morgan --- "Candy" * Vince Guaraldi --- "Jazz Impressions of Black Orpheus" * Cal Tjader --- "Jazz at the Blackhawk" * Paul Desmond --- "Polka Dots and Moonbeams" * Kenny Dorham --- "Quiet Kenny" * Gerry Mulligan --- "Night Lights"


Date: 11-Oct-1998 19:59:20


From: Chris Genzel ( stamil@t-online.de )
Hadley Caliman: "Projecting" (1976) and "Celebration" (1977). Two really beautiful hard bop albums, and I'm not that much into hard bop. Why has Caliman never been released on CD? Julian Priester, "Keep Swingin'" (1960). Again, very beautiful.

Herbie Hancock discography at: http://home.t-online.de/home/stamil/hhdisco.htm


Date: 12-Oct-1998 02:56:50


From: Paul Abella ( Pabella3@aol.com )
How about these?

Eddie Harris: The Electrifying... Lee Morgan: Cornbread Art Blakey: Meet Me At the Jazz Corner of the World anything by Mose Allison Keith Jarrett: Changes Phineas Newborn: A World of Piano Ornette Coleman: Something Else! Cannonball Adderley: Country Preacher Larry Young: Unity Chick Corea: Now He Sings, Now He Sobs

Those are my picks.

Keep Your Ears Open, Paul


Date: 12-Oct-1998 08:59:57
From: Jonathan Kranz ( jonkranz@mediaone.net )
Wow! People are coming up with great stuff! I'd like to add another: Stephane Grapelli, "It's Only a Paper Moon."

Grappelli's "Paper Moon" is one of those budget CDs (I got it for $3.99) that I usually avoid—most of the time, you get what you pay for. But a friend bought a copy, played it, and I was amazed; the playing is fresh, vital and inventive throughout. The two duos with Earl Hines, recorded in 1974, justify rushing to the music store (or CD Now or Tower or whatever); Hines was already an old man when he recorded the tracks, but you'd never know it from the music.

FYI: It's on "Four Star" records, distributed by KEM Enterprises, Inc.


Date: 13-Oct-1998 04:10:28
From: Edwin De Leeuw ( edwin.deleeuw@wkb.be )
Lee Morgan—"The Leeway" Miles Davis—"Volume one" (Blue Note) Miles Davis—"Porgy and Bess" (Best jazz ever) Philip Cath?rine—"Live" (fantastic live album from one of Belgium's most respected jazz guitar players) Weather Report—"Heavy Weather" (of course)

Mind you, it's been only a year or two since I really discovered jazz as a musical style. It's getting better every day !!

CU all ! Ed




Date: 13-Oct-1998 10:47:46
From: Eliot ( esem@dsuper.net )
Hi folks,

Just a message to tell you that you should at least give us some description of the artist/music you are listing... This would help people like me who don`t know much of those names to know if that wold interest us.




Date: 13-Oct-1998 17:43:07
From: Paul ( Pabella3@aol.com )
Elliot— here they are, descriptions of my favorite obscure jazz albums: The Electrifying Eddie Harris: simply one of the most groove heavy but still swingin' jazz albums of the late 60's. If you don't get Eddie you are a no soul fool.

Lee Morgan—Cornbread: Cornbread is one of the hippest Lee Morgan funk tunes, and Our Man Higgins demonstrates once and for all that Billy Higgins is THE most underrated drummer ever.

Art Blakey—Meet me at the Jazz Corner of the World: I just picked this one up and DAMN!!! is it good. Lots of good Blakey-esque soul.

Anything by Mose Allison is worth owning, and my comments for Eddie Harris are relevant here too.

Phineas Newborn—A World of Piano: one of the only "I play jazz therefore I'm smarter than you" styled albums which I like, and Phineas Newborn's playing is why. It's smart and artsy, but funky, too.

Keith Jarrett—Changes: Worth the price of admission for an amazing ballad called Prizm.

Ornette Coleman—Something Else!: Ornette's only album with deliberate chord changes, and it is a great one.

Cannonball Adderley—Country Preacher: One of the funkiest legitimate jazz albums ever. Nuff Said.

Larry Young—Unity: What not to say? Elvin, Joe Henderson, Woody Shaw and Larry. put those in a blender and enjoy. repeat.

Chick Corea—Now He Sings...: Chick's last great album pre RTF. with Roy Haynes and Dave Holland.

I hope that helps.

Keep Your Ears Open, Paul


Date: 13-Oct-1998 21:10:41
From: Jonathan Kranz ( jonkranz@mediaone.net )
Elliot's right: it would be appropriate to include annotation with our choices (as Paul has done). Here goes:

"Lucky Strikes": Lucky Thompson is a tenor and soprano saxophonist who crossed over from heavy-duty, Hawkins-like swing to bebop. (In fact, he was in Charlie Parker's quintet for the 1946 Dial recordings). "Lucky Strikes" comes later in his career, (I'm not sure when. Late '50's? Early '60's?) and features a beautifully balanced mix of originals and standards, all of it understated and sensitive without getting "precious."

"Buck and Bud": A mid-seventies meeting of two greats: the famous Bud Freeman, a renowned tenor often associated with the traditionalist movement; and Bucky Pizzarelli, an underrated guitarist with flying fingers and powerful bebop leanings. This one could have been an odd couple pairing, but they listen to each other well and obviously find inspritation in the match—which they generously share with the audience.

"Tommy Flanagan Trio Overseas": The first recording (mothballed for years) under his own name by a pianist associated with some of jazz's all time greatest recordings, such as Coltrane's "Giant Steps" and Rollins' "Saxophone Colossus." With bassist Wilbur Ware and drummer Elvin Jones (yes!) they record powerful and poetic covers of Parker's "Relaxin' at Camarillo," Strayhorn's "Chelsea Bridge" and other great stuff that eludes me at the moment. This is one of those rare albums that will please both an afficionado who loves great jazz piano and a newby.

"Jugs and Dodo": Jugs is Gene Ammons, son of the great stride pianist and a master of the big-bellied, masculine tenor sax sound. Dodo is Dodo Marmorosa, one of the many white bebop pianists (like Joe Albany and Al Haig) who showed great promise in the '40's before sinking into obscurity. Dodo, like Lucky Thompson, played with Parker in the 1946 Dial sessions. They're an even odder couple than Buck and Bud, but their album, like the former's, works really well, gritty and pretty at the same time.

Here's another one: "It's Uptown with the George Benson Quintet." Yup, that George Benson. Before he greased the airwaves with smoooooth (albeit well-played) lite jazz makeout music, Benson burst on the scene as an up-and-coming traditional jazz guitarist ready to take his place with Montgomery et al. Great mix of material, including a flamenco-inspired piece and even some early (and charming) Benson vocals.

Also, I agree with Paul about Billy Higgins. I don't know if Higgins is THE most underrated drummer, but he sure has to be one of them. Damn he's good.

And for you Lee Morgan fans out there, check out Art Blakey's "The Big Beat": Morgan's solo on "Paper Moon" is a masterpiece of architecture and fire. I'll definitely look into "Candy" and "Cornbread."


Date: 14-Oct-1998 01:48:22
From: Paul ( face it, you already have it )
John, you have made my list of top 10 brilliant jazz types in reference to the thumbs up on Morgan's solo on Paper Moon. I knew I wasn't the only one...


Date: 14-Oct-1998 02:07:00
From: Steve Wilson ( swilson19@juno.com )
O.K., this looks like a fun and informative area so here goes with the albums I find myself coming back to after the newness has worn off most of the current jazz: Miles (who else): Jack Johnson Bitches Brew In A Silent Way Seven Steps To Heaven Chronicles (The Complete Prestige...) Buddy Rich: Mercy, Mercy The New One Rich In London Woody Herman: Giant Steps Chick Corea: Return To Forever (The very first one with Flora, Airto, Joe Farrell, and Stanley Clarke.) Now He Sings, Now He Sobs Hymn To The Seventh Galaxy John McLaughlin: My Goals Beyond Billy Cobham: Crosswinds Maynard Ferguson: The complete Roulette Recordings Brubeck: and Mulligan, Live at the Berlin Phil. Mulligan: Quiet Nights The Age Of Steam Joe Farrell: Quartet Bill Evans: All Vols. of Live at the Montreux Jazz Festival Stan Getz: Focus Captain Marvel Herbie Hancock: Maiden Voyage Thrust Stanley Turrentine: Sugar

All for now, mini-reviews later. Steve.


Date: 14-Oct-1998 11:58:06
From: Steve Wilson ( swilson19@juno.com )
Tom Scott: "Born Again." What a beautiful tone Tom gets on his tenor. From my list above you know I have no problem with electric Jazz or jazz-rock fusion (oh no, the "f" word,) but this album has no, nada, none fusion Just great straight-ahead mainstream jazz. I remember Tom pre-70's when all he would play is jazz. Still in college, he played with the pre-electric Don Ellis big band in the L.A. area, and his influences were (mostly) Cannonball, and Oliver Nelson. This album is a monster, I kid you not. Try it once and it won't be far from your stereo for a long time. Also dig Randy Brecker and Kenny Kirkland on this disc.


Date: 14-Oct-1998 18:47:18
From: ChriS ( cslawec9@idt.net )
I got into Jazz through the 70s Soul-Funk bag. My personal underrated classics would be:

Yusef Lateef's Funk album produced for CTI by Creed Taylor, Autophysiopsychic.

Sun Ra's The Singles , a two-CD set from Evidence which captures everything from his backing vocal doo-wop groups and BUDDY GUY to an outta space version of "The Batman Theme" and Ra's usual off the wall shit.

Art Farmer's The Summer Knows , a collection of ballads (including Burt Bacharach's classic "Alfie") done in his warm and wonderful tender tone.

John Klemmer's Hush , see Farmer above.

And finally, the two albums that turned me into the sprawling mess you see before you: Les McCann Live At Montreux , a two-record four-side party suite, and Yusef Lateef's Hush N' Thunder , which includes my all time favorite psuedo-classical Funk jam, "Opus, Part I" and "II." Great, great topic.


Date: 14-Oct-1998 18:52:14
From: ChriS ( cslawec9@idt.net )
Damn! I forgot Mingus Plays Piano , a collection of Mingus piano solos so stunningly beautiful I don't know how anyone who ever heard it could possibly forget it, Oliver Nelson's orchestral masterpiece Blues and the Abstract Truth , and my personal favorite Freddie Hubbard album, that slow rolling yet steamy and rockin' Red Clay. Done!


Date: 15-Oct-1998 11:45:27
From: Bill ( ukeleleike@aol.com )
Phineas Newborn; A WORLD OF PIANO. Have to second the previous comment on this disc. The Horace Silver tune "Juicy Lucy" is worth the cover price all by itself.

Harold Land; THE FOX Nifty, tricky L.A-style hard bop (not necessarily an oxymoron. The accelerated title cut is amazing. Includes the underrated Elmo Hope on piano and the only available recordings of the amazing Dupree Bolton, a trumpet player with a truly weird life history...

Thelonious Monk Orchestra LIVE AT TOWN HALL: This is never included in lists of Monk must-haves...I don't know why; the orchestrations are delightful, the band members (including Charlie Rouse, Phil Woods, and Pepper Adams) all have great Monk chops, and it's got the best "Friday the 13th" (a tune that really NEEDS fuller orchestration) ever.

Hanry "Red" Allen; WORLD ON A STRING. Late period (1957) material from a great N'Awlins trumpeter. Mainly for that loooong trumpet solo on "I Cover the Waterfront..."also for great supporting work from Coleman Hawkins and J.C. Higgenbotham.

Herbie Nichols; LOVE, GLOOM, CASH, LOVE. Gotta have some Herbie Nichols. Gotta.


Date: 15-Oct-1998 19:56:34
From: Jonathan Kranz ( jonkranz@mediaone.net )
I bought my first CD based on a recommendation from this thread, "Cornbread." It is, of course, wonderful. (Tip of the hat to Paul.)

I want all the other contributors to know that I'm eagerly searching for their selections, especially, "Candy," "World of Piano," "We Three," the Vince Guaraldi Black Orpheus CD, and many others I'm too tired and wine-sodden to recall at this moment.

And I agree that Monk's "Live at Town Hall" album deserves greater praise. In fact, it's the first Monk album I ever heard; I friend loaned it to me when I was 15 or 16. I've been searching for it since. (And Charlie Rouse is one of those musicians who deserves greater acclaim.)

I have a mystery I wonder if you can solve: two albums by "TCB" records, one by Freddie Hubbard called "Getting Together," number 1001, and featuring Curtis Fuller; and TCB number 1002 by Donald Byrd, with Herbie Hancock. I got these for free before a used-record shop owner threw them away. I've never seen them mentioned in any review of these artists' works. Has anyone ever seen or heard them before? Does anyone know who the sidemen are on the Hubbard album? Does anyone know anything about the mysterious "TCB"?

By the way, they're not bad—hard driving bop in the Blue Note mode without the great recording quality.


Date: 15-Oct-1998 21:31:58
From: earl d ( eldphd@infohwy.com )
Frankie Laine and Buck Clayton, "Jazz Spectacular." Orig. issued in 1956 on Col., with Clayton, Winding, J.J. Johnson, Charles Thompson, et. al. Re-issued in part on Frankie Laine on Cedar CD433.


Date: 16-Oct-1998 14:27:21
From: dave wayne
great but obscure recordings are too often made by great but obscure artists: here are just a few... Joe Daley Trio: Live at Newport '63 John Carter & Bobby Bradford: "Self-Determination Music" and "Seeking" Horace Tapscott: "The Dark Tree, volumes 1 & 2" Noah Howard: "Schizophrenic Blues," "The Black Ark" Manfred Schoof Sextet: "Glockenbar" Frank Wright: "Kevin, My Dear Son" Wolfgang Dauner: "Free Action" etc., etc., etc.

great but obscure recordings are made by established artists trying to extend the possibilities of music in some way, but perhaps not in the way that people expect (...or even want to hear!). Here are a few of those: Tony Williams' Lifetime: "Turn it Over" and "Ego" Miles Davis: "Agartha," "On the Corner" Henry Threadgill: "Spirit of Nuff Nuff" Blood Ulmer & the Music Revelation Ensemble: pretty much everything! Shannon Jackson: "Eye on You" Tim Berne: "Fulton Street Maul" Max Roach—just about everything!! Red Allen—"World on a String" (glad to see someone else mentioned this as well!) etc., etc., etc.

great but obscure recordings may result from contractural difficulties, poor distribution (Europe-only), bad business practices, or changing record labels: Keith Jarrett "Expectations" Alan Silva & the Celestrial (sic) Communications Orch. "Seasons" Abdullah Ibrahim: "Ekaya," "Water from an Ancient Well" Randy Weston—"African Cookbook" etc., etc., etc. (...as well as some of the ones mentioned above)

....I just can't explain 'em all, though! Marion Brown—"Three for Shepp," "Porto Novo" Roswell Rudd—"Flexible Flyer," "Inside Job," "Everywhere" Anthony Braxton—"Creative Orchestra Music, 1976" Gil Evans: "Svengali" Ralph Towner—"Solstice" Sam Rivers—pretty much everything!

that's the view from here, anyway. dw


Date: 16-Oct-1998 15:06:40
From: jeff putterman ( jeff@limc.com )
Dave Holland's Conference of the Birds; Chico Freeman's Pied Piper and Sensitive; Cecil McBee's Unspoken; Betty Carter and Carmen McRae Live; John Hicks and Ray Drummond's Two of a Kind; Steve Slagle and Ryan Kisor on Steeplechase (can't remember the name). These are some of the cds I return to over and over and over. Along with all of the Mingus big Band cds.


Date: 16-Oct-1998 15:32:56
From: Reynolds Potter ( reynolds@dovebrothers.com )
I highly recommend THE PENGUIN GUIDE TO JAZZ ON CD as a source book of jazz information. I have seen nothing else in the marketplace that come close to the depth or breadth on coverage which it provides. It is a terrific way to prescreen potential purchases.


Date: 16-Oct-1998 21:31:01
From: John Barrett Jr. ( johnbarrettjr@yahoo.com )
My list of favorite obscurities is a bit short here; I know I'll return here later when I think of more.

VINCE GUARALDI TRIO (Fantasy). This might be of interest to the person looking for BLACK ORPHEUS. Marvelous soft introspective playing from Guaraldi before he developed the heavier "Charlie Brown" style he is best known for. Includes a swell version of "Django," the Guaraldi original "Fenwyck's Farfel," and the very underrated guitarist Eddie Duran, with whom Guaraldi made several other albums. NOEL JEWKES AND THE DR. LEGATO EXPRESS: JUST PASSIN' THRU (Revelation). Got this sealed in a used store several years ago, with no prior knowledge of the players. It's a nine- or ten-piece group with big band voicings, nifty charts, and most of the tunes are originals by Jewkes, who worked in Florida, if memory serves. I've seen Jewkes' name on one other record, but don't know if he or the Express made any records after this. TONE JANSA JAZZ KVARTET (RTB). Another used store find, from the same place I got the Jewkes. RTB was the state record label of Yugoslavia, and the late date cited on the liner notes is 1975; I guess this came out in the mid- to late-'Seventies. Jansa plays a trilling soprano sax (tenor too) and gets into four basic compositions, with Jansa and pianist Andre Jeanquartier standing out. The notes are mostly in a language I can't read (Serbo-Croatian?), so I don't know how or when this was recorded; at least half of the album is live. Would be very interested to know more about Jansa and what other records (if any) he made.

That's it for now; I'll think of more great obscurities later.


Date: 16-Oct-1998 21:32:45
From: Judson O. Maynard ( jazzbo112@aol.com )
Thought that I would add a couple of albums for consideration. Tal Farlow—This is Tal Farlow on the Verve label and Johnny Smith—Johnny Smith also on the Verve label. Both of these albums seem to have had an influence on guitar playaers that I have spoken to but seem to have been largely ignored by the jazz buyers. I had both of these on vinyl and recently picked up both of them on cd and realized again how beautifully played both of these albums are. Check them out if you get a chance.


Date: 17-Oct-1998 08:05:35
From: george massouris ( ms@gw.cranny.schnet.edu.au )
my current faves that i just keep playing:

1.mingus in wondeland 2.coltrane—ascension..........the mostconfronting music ever made 3.mccoy tyner—impressions from Infinity.......this is a must for any fan of jazz piano or jazz in general 4. art pepper—road game 5.joe henderson—the elements 6.archie shepp—attica blues 7. albert ayler—new grass.........an interesting departure 8.pharoah sanders—black unity 9.ben webster—soulville 10.brnford marsalis—the beautiful ones........not many can beat this in the modern era.

far more interesting than kind of blue.......dont you think


Date: 18-Oct-1998 13:01:43
From: Lars Auby ( lars.auby@linkoping.mail.telia.com )
Gary Bartz: Harlem Bush Music Art Ensemble Of Chicago: Fanfare For The Warriors Don Cherry: Complete Communion Alice Coltrane: Universal Consciouness Miles Davis: Dark Magus Herbie Hancock: Sextant Eddie Henderson: Realization Chick Corea: Song Of Singing Anthony Braxton: Five Pieces 1975 Andrew Hill: Andrew Paul Bley: Ramblin Yusef Lateef: The Blue... Courtney Pine: Modern Day Jazz Stories Pharoah Sanders: Karma Archie Shepp: The Way Ahead Sun Ra: Supersonic Jazz Miroslav Vitous: Infinite Search Jimmy Giuffre: Thesis


Date: 19-Oct-1998 17:35:24
From: Paul Abella ( Pabella3@aol.com )
Not that this one is obscure, but I just picked up Still Life talking by Pat Metheny, and although it may be a little smooth for some tastes, I really like it. For some more swingin' stuff by Metheny, Rejoicing (on ECM with Charlie Haden and Billy Higgins)and Question and Answer (on Geffen with Roy Haynes and Dave Holland). Both of these are brilliant sessions. Enjoy!

Keep Your Ears Open, Paul


Date: 19-Oct-1998 19:33:42
From: Jp ( pjaizz@hotmail.com )
Good picks so far, so a few from me...in no particular order

1) Billie Holiday Live at Monterey (Blackhawk) Late Lady Day amidst the planes of the festival. Great side work from Mulligan!

2) Weather Report Weather Report 1st (Columbia) When fusion was exciting and groundbreaking!

3) Eberhard Weber Yellow Fields (ECM) Modal jazzzz with a great feel. Charlie Mariano is exquisite!

4) Sonny Rollins Alfie Soundtrack (Impulse!) Sonny swings sooo very hard!

5) Dexter Gordon Our Man in Paris (Blue Note) Smooth and exciting, Dexter leaps!

6) Eric Dolphy Out There (New Jazz) The master on a tour of the outside...

7) Duke Ellington Live at the Plaza (Columbia) Duke rolls 'em, with cameo from Billie!

8) Wynton Marsalis Blood on the Fields (Columbia) A very strong, heartfelt work, though best heard live.

9) Keith Jarrett Live at the Blue Note (ECM) Jarrett at the top of his form?! Great interaction with DeJonette & Peacock!

Wild Card

10) Joni Mitchell Hissing of Summer Lawns (Elektra) Ok, give me this one. Joni has more jazzzz in her heart than any of these copycat wannbes today. Simply stunning, different album. Stereo Review called it simply "Joni Jazz," an apt description. Hear it and tell me what you think...

All best heard on Lp, of course!

Thanks!

Jp pjaizz@hotmail.com


Date: 20-Oct-1998 00:56:48
From: brett sroka ( bsroka@hotmail.com )
Here's my two cents. These are some really great ELLINGTON albums that most of the jazz musicians I know haven't even heard: -ANATOMY OF A MURDER -MASTERPEICES BY ELLINGTON -SUCH SWEET THUNDER and how about MILES DAVIS -"L'ASCENSEUR POUR L'ECHAFAUD CHARLES MINGUS -THE COMPLETE TOWN HALL CONCERT or if you want some really obscure and truly great albums SAM RIVERS -CONTOURS a great bluenote album with FREDDIE HUBBARD and HERBIE HANCOCK ANDREW HILL -ONE FOR ONE another great bluenote alblum featuring FREDDIE HUBBARD and JOE HENDERSON ANDREW HILL -COMPULSION a very "out" but extraordinary record also with FREDDIE HUBBARD and JOHN GILMORE ANDREW HILL -QUARTET WITH SAM RIVERS this is extremely rare and extremely brilliant check out JASON MORAN's upcoming album on bluenote


Date: 20-Oct-1998 13:08:10
From: Phil Brown
How about: Shelia—Shelia Jordan African Piano—Dollar Brand

Some classics from 1970's UK Michael Gibbs by Michael Gibbs Celebration, Release by Mike Westbrook Edge of Time by Norma Winstone (though anything by her is good) Back Door by Back Door Perspectives—Stan Tracey Diversions—Bob Downes open Music

Phil


Date: 20-Oct-1998 16:35:03
From: mike kemper ( mike.kemper@platinumed.com )
Those are some great picks and a lot of them bring back pleasant memories. I would just like to add the name Gerald Wilson for some of the best and most inventive "Big Band" writing and arranging ever recorded. The following titles are all on Pacific Jazz(if you can find them). "Orchestra Portraits" "The Golden Sword" "Viva Tirado" "Greatest Hits" The personnel include Harold Land, Bobby Hutcherson, Teddy Wilson, Carmel Jones, Bud Shank and a plethora of west coast players.


Date: 20-Oct-1998 17:51:57
From: Karl Tiderman ( karl.tiderman@swipnet.se )
Some great but (fairly) obscure albums you all should listen to:

John Coltrane & Rashied Ali: Interstellar Space Don Cherry: Brown Rice Tina Brooks: True Blue Duke Ellington: Ellington Jazz Party in Stereo Roland Kirk: I Talk to the Spirits Pharoah Sanders: Village of the Pharoahs Sun Ra: Solo Piano, vol 1 (+ most of his stuff...)

And not forgetting home—a great CD by a Swedish band:

Christer Both?n Band: The Spirit of Milvus Milvus


Date: 21-Oct-1998 01:12:52
From: Ken Brown ( kenbrown@unforgettable.com )
The great new Gene Krupa Quartet featuring Charlie Ventura

Totally great arrangements of some standard tunes. Gene's dynamics and tasty solos wonderful. Charlie a master. Very exciting.

Alone— Bill Evans


Date: 21-Oct-1998 08:28:16
From: Jon ( jon.stone@fmr.com )
A record I keep returning to over and over again is "Crosscurrents," Lennie Tristano's seminal Capitol recordings. Truly virtuosic, if somewhat cerebral, playing abounds on this one.


Date: 21-Oct-1998 10:15:39
From: jim smith
Hey Elliot, Just go out there and enjoy the highs and lows of discovering "The Music."I envy the journey you are about to embark on,as I guess many of the guys are to.My list,with no pointers to help you will follow. Bon Voyage.


Date: 21-Oct-1998 11:35:43
From: E. S. ( EDS1158533@aol.com )
Although its hardly obscure, Grant Green's "Solid" is my favorite record by my favorite guitarist and is one of my favorite 60's Blue Note records (it was unreleased until the 80's though) It's got Joe Henderson and James Spaulding on saxophones and they smoke through "Ezzthetic," "The Kicker," "Solid," and other great tunes.


Date: 21-Oct-1998 15:42:39
From: Pat Marcotte ( marcotte@millcomm.com )
Duke Ellington and Alice Babs, "Serenade to Sweden" Absolutely gorgeous!


Date: 21-Oct-1998 15:48:29
From: W Keil
Phil Woods with Michel Legrande & his orchestra: Images. This one cooks!


Date: 21-Oct-1998 19:50:53
From: Evan A. Voytas ( jazzguitpa@aol.com )
I like "Cape Verdean Blues" by Horace silver. Its got some cool grooves


Date: 22-Oct-1998 00:30:06
From: mike kaplan ( slapkappy@aol.com )
here's a few to add: Warne Marsh: "Release record-Send Tape" also "Jazz From The East Village" These are 2 sessions by an underrated giant of improvised music at the top of his game back in the early '60s. They are quite hard to find....i dont even have the originals...someone taped them for me. If you're looking for other Warne that might be more readily available, you might get "Ballad Album"(Criss Cross) or "Jazz Exchange"(any of the volumes now available).

Gil Evans---"New Bottle, Old Wine" also "Great Jazz Standards" brilliant reorchestrations, reinterpretations and reimaginings of classic standards...one album a showcase for the soulful trumpet of Johnny Coles, the other featuring the joyful alto sax of Cannonball Adderley

Johnny Hodges---"Everybody Knows Johnny Hodges"(Impulse) great small group Ellingtonia from a bunch of esteemed Ellington band members and others....check out "Stompy Jones" and what Richard Davis is laying down on bass behind some of the soloists!!!

Bennie Wallace---"Twilight Time"(Blue Note) New Orleans-style funk from a totally original tenor saxophonist who has forged his own style from influences as disparate as Eric Dolphy and Ben Webster

Kenny Dorham---"Whistle Stop"(Blue Note) Kenny, Hank Mobley, Kenny Drew, Mr P.C. and Philly Joe performing some great KD compositions...what more needs to be said?




Date: 22-Oct-1998 16:17:15
From: Gary ( ilukrion@voicenet.com )
With all the great jazz that was put out in the 50's and 60's it is difficult to suggest a few of the "best" picks. here goes. 1. Kenny Dorham- Whistle Stop. If you ever find a copy on CD, GRAB it! You won't regret it. Bop at its best with Philly Joe Jones playing at his best. All star ensemble. 2. Chick Corea- Now He Sings, Now He Sobs. Beautiful trio jazz with loads of twists and turns to keep even the most casual listener captivated. All three players play an equal role in this recording. It may not leave your player for days. 3.Andrew Hill- Smokestack and Blackfire. Andrew has a very distinct style. The music has a definate jazz tradition but sometimes borders on new territories. 4. Roy Haynes- Out of the Afternoon. Roy will forever be one of the greats. The music is very strong and his solos mirror of the melody. This was my first exposure to Roland Kirk. This album is a favorate of many friends. 5. Joe Henderson- Mode for Joe. Bobby Hutcherson and Joe Chambers play on this album and give the rhythm section a lift. Not quite a straight ahead album. NOT avante Garde. Try it. 6. Jackie McLean- Destination Out! Very Textural approach. Bobby Hutcherson, Grachan Moncur III, Roy Haynes, Larry Ridley. A new direction then, it still sounds very fresh. The list is endless I would check out a few of these. Lee Morgan- Indeed! Herbie Hancock-Any BlueNote 60's Rec. Art Blakey and Jazz Msgrs.- All great look for players you know. Eric Dolphy John Coltrane- Blue Train Anything up to Cresent is safe. Miles Davis 50's Quintet is a great place to start move up an album at a time and look for albums done by his sidemen. Hank Mobley One of the most underrated sax players. Workout. Sonny Clark- Trio, Cool Struttin and Complete Quartets (actually released under Grant Green) Have fun listening


Date: 22-Oct-1998 16:19:05
From: Gary ( ilukrion@voicenet.com )
With all the great jazz that was put out in the 50's and 60's it is difficult to suggest a few of the "best" picks. here goes. 1. Kenny Dorham- Whistle Stop. If you ever find a copy on CD, GRAB it! You won't regret it. Bop at its best with Philly Joe Jones playing at his best. All star ensemble. 2. Chick Corea- Now He Sings, Now He Sobs. Beautiful trio jazz with loads of twists and turns to keep even the most casual listener captivated. All three players play an equal role in this recording. It may not leave your player for days. 3.Andrew Hill- Smokestack and Blackfire. Andrew has a very distinct style. The music has a definate jazz tradition but sometimes borders on new territories. 4. Roy Haynes- Out of the Afternoon. Roy will forever be one of the greats. The music is very strong and his solos mirror of the melody. This was my first exposure to Roland Kirk. This album is a favorate of many friends. 5. Joe Henderson- Mode for Joe. Bobby Hutcherson and Joe Chambers play on this album and give the rhythm section a lift. Not quite a straight ahead album. NOT avante Garde. Try it. 6. Jackie McLean- Destination Out! Very Textural approach. Bobby Hutcherson, Grachan Moncur III, Roy Haynes, Larry Ridley. A new direction then, it still sounds very fresh. The list is endless I would check out a few of these. Lee Morgan- Indeed! Herbie Hancock-Any BlueNote 60's Rec. Art Blakey and Jazz Msgrs.- All great look for players you know. Eric Dolphy John Coltrane- Blue Train Anything up to Cresent is safe. Miles Davis 50's Quintet is a great place to start move up an album at a time and look for albums done by his sidemen. Hank Mobley One of the most underrated sax players. Workout. Sonny Clark- Trio, Cool Struttin and Complete Quartets (actually released under Grant Green) Have fun listening


Date: 22-Oct-1998 18:53:13
From: Scott Mortensen
Here's a few of my favorites that are a bit obscure:

John McLaughlin, Extrapolation. McLaughlin's first record plays nothing like his later music with the Mahavishnu Orchestra and later solo work. John Surman's baritone sax is stunning and Tony Oxley's drumming is great also. I can't figure out why EVERYONE doesn't know about this record.

Jimmy Giuffre, 1961. ECM's reissue of two albums by Giuffre, Fusion and Thesis. Influential early chamber-style jazz that borders on free while never completely going there.

Booker Ervin, That's It. Booker's my pick for THE most underrated saxophonist. I discovered his music through Mingus' Live at Antibes, which, if you don't have, you should go buy immediately! Booker also played with Randy Weston, another underrated musician who seems to be finally getting his due. That's It is a solid example of Booker's distinctive hard-bop style.




Date: 23-Oct-1998 11:43:43
From: andr?s pascual
Pat Metheny Group: "quartet."


Date: 23-Oct-1998 21:54:55
From: Jim Lees ( ridlees@tbaytel.net )
I am fairly neophyte at all this, but I love hard bop, late 50's, early 60's and one I keep playing...

A study in Brown—Clifford Brown/Max Roach, clear, crisp, muscular, a pleasure




Date: 27-Oct-1998 08:33:35
From: jim smith ( JimSmith@port.ac.uk )
Just a few I love to play. Kenny Burrell—ELLINGTON IS FOEVER.Ray Bryant—ALONE WITH THE BLUES. Bill Evans—SYMBIOSIS.Clare Fischer—FIRST TIME OUT.Eddie Condon—COAST TO COAST JAM SESSION.Buck Clayton—HOW HI THE FI.Basie/Ellington—BATTLE ROYAL.Lee Morgan—MONDAY NIGHT AT BIRDLAND.Art Pepper—PLUS ELEVEN. George Russell—NEW YORK NY.John Lewis—EUROPEAN WINDOWS.Oscar Peterson—VERY TALL.Archie Shepp—GOIN'HOME.Oliver Nelson—NOCTURNE.And a few Broadway moments,SOUTH PACIFIC—Chico Hamilton.WEST SIDE STORY—Cal Tjader.KING AND I—Mastersounds and last but not least MY FAIR LADY—Andre Previn/Shelly Manne


Date: 28-Oct-1998 02:45:41
From: Dan Sermeno ( ramtrane@soca.com )
Obscurities;

Mongo Santamaria- Explodes Live at the Village Gate (If you can find it let me know where!)

Charles Lloyd- Forest Flower, Sunrise/Sunset Monterey Jazz Festival

Hugh Masekela's Next Album

Nancy Wilson- You Better Go (single)

Anything by Sandra Booker




Date: 28-Oct-1998 08:11:51
From: nguyen van tam ( tam@mb3.tu-chemnitz.de )
hi all,

an exciting topic!!

so some of my own "obscurities"

max roach "deeds, not words"—riverside paul bley "improvisation: introducing paul bley"—debut charles mingus "pre bird"—emarcy charles mingus "plays piano"—impulse sonny rollins "work's time"—prestige sonny rollins "on impulse"—impulse chick corea "piano improvisation vol. 1"—EMC chick corea "circle / paeris concert"—EMC kenny wheeler "gnu high"—EMC kenny wheeler "double double you"- EMC keith jarrett "stair cases"—EMC

bye folks


Date: 28-Oct-1998 09:19:23
From: Jonas Gruvaeus ( gruvaeus@yahoo.com )
Here are my suggestions. I've omitted most things I've seen on lists above, I just might have missed one or two. Happy listening! If anybodys got a spare copy of Gary Bartz I've Known Rivers Please get in touch!

Art Ensemble of Chicago- Les Stances au Sophie.(Path?/Nessa) Marion Brown- Sweet Earth Flying. (Impulse) Ornette Coleman- Tone Dialling. (Harmolodic) Miles- Dark Magus.(Sony, Jpn) Miles- Get up with it. (Columbia) Miles- On the corner. (Columbia) Herbie Hancock- Crossings. (WB) Andrew Hill- Point of Departure. (Blue Note) Rahsaan Roland Kirk—The Inflated Tear. (Atlantic) Yusuf Lateef- Detroit Latitude 43"30' Longitude 85."(Atlantic) Greg Osby- 3D lifestyles. (Blue Note) Sam Rivers- Paragon. (Fluid) Sonny Sharrock- Black Woman. (Vortex) Archie Shepp- Blas?. (Actuel) Wayne Shorter- Super Nova (Blue Note) Alan Silva- Luna Surface. (Actuel) Sun Ra- Nuits de la fundation Maeght vol 1 & 2.(Shandar) Cassandra Wilson- Blue Until Dawn. (Blue Note)


Date: 28-Oct-1998 18:14:04
From: Serge Batusanski ( sbatusanski@yahoo.com )
For the pleasure of the melody : - Dexter Gordon : Tania (on Blue Note) - Grant Green : Idle Moments (on Blue Note)

and for a great surprise, a groovy and funky music : - Haywood Henry (bs) : The gentle monster Joe Newman (t) Uptown Record UP 27.13 Hank Jones (p) George Duvivier (b) Ben Riley (dr)

From Paris




Date: 29-Oct-1998 15:11:35
From: earl grey ( I have @e-mail )
Larry Young— Lawrence Of Newark Paul Bley—Closer Keith Jarret—Expectations Dave Holland—Conference Of The Birds Gateway Joe Zawinul—Zawinul




Date: 31-Oct-1998 08:42:08
From: Joe Hamlin ( joe@dnaco.net )
Several of my favorites have alread been mentioned and there were some artists I had never heard of that I am going to check out. Would like to add three favorites I have not seen mentioned yet. Tony Scott & Bill Evans—A Day in New York Tony Scott—clarinet or baritone sax Bill Evans—piano Milt Hinton or Henry Grimes—bass Paul Motian—drums


Date: 03-Nov-1998 02:47:30
From: jim dunbar ( jimbospad@aol.com )
Boyd Raeburn—Boyd Meets Stravinsky

wow


Date: 03-Nov-1998 09:04:24
From: Jos? Domingos Raffaelli ( jdr@musicshop.com.br )
Jonathan Kranz,

I agree completely with you concerning Lucky Thompson LUCKY STRIKES (this is from the mid-60's) Tommy Flanagan Trio OVERSEAS (bassist is Wilbur Little) Gene Ammons & Dodo Marmarosa JUG & DOD Tomorrow I'll give you all details about the TCB-1001 and TCB-1002. As I'm not in home, I'll check all informations tonight.

Let me add the following record:

DUKE JORDAN LIVE IN JAPAN (Steeplechase), reissued in a double CD. This is a great session IMHO, with Jordan in fantastic form. I believe I never heard him play with such stream of ideas, so much fire and a big amount of swing, in complete rapport with Wilbur Little (bass) and the great Roy Haynes (drums). Jordan play many of his originals (Jordu, Paula, Scotch Blues, No Problem, the moving Misty Thursday) and many more. This recording came from two Japanese concerts and the sound quality is incredible, we can hear and feel all the joy of the enthusiastic audience. Although Duke Jordan is overlooked by most people, he is one of my long standing favorites since the days he played on the unforgettable Charlie Parker quintet.

Barney Willen BARNEY (French RCA Victor)—a great live recording with Kenny Dorham (trumpet), Duke Jordan (piano), Bibi Rovere (bass) and Daniel Humair (drums). This is a weonderful session made in 1959 on a Parisian night club with Dorham, Willen and Jordan in top form. They play eight tunes, including LADY BIRD (Jordan play a gem of solo—he say more in his 3:30 minute improvisation than most players on piles of CDs), BESAME MUCHO, STABLEMATES, JORDU, ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE and three more. For those who believe that European drummers don't swing, they must hear Daniel Humair.


Date: 06-Nov-1998 06:14:22
From: Jos? Domingos Raffaelli ( jdr@musicshop.com.br )
Jonathan Kranz,

The TCB records are reissues from the long defunct Warwick label. One of them is titled SOUL OF JAZZ PERCUSSION, with many different groups. The Donald Byrd album originally was released in the name of another musician. I'm tracing this correctly to give you all details. Sorry, but wait a little more. Jos?


Date: 07-Nov-1998 15:32:08
From: F?lix-Antoine Hamel ( bhamel@pandore.qc.ca )
A record I play quite often and I enjoy a lot is Phil Woods' 1974 "MUSIQUE DU BOIS" on the Muse label, with Jaki Byard on piano, Richard Davis on bass and Alan Dawson on drums. I think Phil's 1968-1970 band European Rhythm Machine (with George Gruntz, Henri Texier and Daniel Humair) is also a very underrated band. Any 1960's Joe Henderson Blue Note album also can be recommended ("PAGE ONE," "OUR THING," "IN 'N' OUT," "INNER URGE" and "MODE FOR JOE"). Dexter Gordon is one of my favorite players and I think he is still underrated for the influence he had on the modern saxophonists (notably on John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins). I have his complete 60s Blue Note recordings ("GO!" and "OUR MAN IN PARIS" are my favorites), but I strongly recommand "HOMECOMING: LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD" (Columbia, 1976), mainly for the presence of the marvelous trumpeter Woody Shaw, who is still a very underrated player. Dexter's 1978 "GREAT ENCOUNTERS" is also very exciting for his "chases" with an other tenor great, Johnny Griffin. I'm glad someone else mentionned Thelonious Monk's "ORCHESTRA AT TOWN HALL," because it's also a record I enjoy very much and I think it deserves a wider recognition. Charles Mingus' "OH YEAH" (Atlantic, 1961) features Roland Kirk and Booker Ervin in great form and I still don't understand why this album (one of the most adventurous I've heard from Mingus) is still widely ignored.

Have a good (jazz) time! FAH


Date: 07-Nov-1998 15:33:56
From: F?lix-Antoine Hamel ( bhamel@pandore.qc.ca )
A record I play quite often and I enjoy a lot is Phil Woods' 1974 "MUSIQUE DU BOIS" on the Muse label, with Jaki Byard on piano, Richard Davis on bass and Alan Dawson on drums. I think Phil's 1968-1970 band European Rhythm Machine (with George Gruntz, Henri Texier and Daniel Humair) is also a very underrated band. Any 1960's Joe Henderson Blue Note album also can be recommended ("PAGE ONE," "OUR THING," "IN 'N' OUT," "INNER URGE" and "MODE FOR JOE"). Dexter Gordon is one of my favorite players and I think he is still underrated for the influence he had on the modern saxophonists (notably on John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins). I have his complete 60s Blue Note recordings ("GO!" and "OUR MAN IN PARIS" are my favorites), but I strongly recommand "HOMECOMING: LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD" (Columbia, 1976), mainly for the presence of the marvelous trumpeter Woody Shaw, who is still a very underrated player. Dexter's 1978 "GREAT ENCOUNTERS" is also very exciting for his "chases" with an other tenor great, Johnny Griffin. I'm glad someone else mentionned Thelonious Monk's "ORCHESTRA AT TOWN HALL," because it's also a record I enjoy very much and I think it deserves a wider recognition. Charles Mingus' "OH YEAH" (Atlantic, 1961) features Roland Kirk and Booker Ervin in great form and I still don't understand why this album (one of the most adventurous I've heard from Mingus) is still widely ignored.

Have a good (jazz) time! FAH


Date: 07-Nov-1998 17:36:51
From: Sherman Ferguson ( drumshop@earthlink.net )
This is addressed to Paul Abella. The bassists on"Now He Sings Now He Sobs" was not Dave Holland.It was Miraslav Vitous. And this also is one of my favorites!

Sherman Ferguson...And Paul...you too keep your ears open! Later


Date: 10-Nov-1998 10:04:57
From: Mike Zickar ( mzickar@bgnet.bgsu.edu )
I think Dave Holland's Conference of the Birds (ECM) deserves to be mentioned in the same light as all the other desert island discs. I refuse to mention any other great albums to avoid diluting support for this tremendous work.


Date: 14-Nov-1998 01:38:27
From: Daniel J. Wilson ( djdrums@macfreak.com )
Blakey's "Free For All" and "Three Blind Mice Vols. 1 & 2"

Dexter Gordon "Tangorine"

Woody Shaw "Moontrane"


Date: 15-Nov-1998 19:04:46
From: PrezPal ( Rifftide@yahoo.com )
Just surfing....thought I'd add a couple: Bengt Berger 'Bitter Funeral Beer' on ECM Europe. Features Don Cherry. Based on Ghanaian funeral music. Lots of percussion, some African instruments; tough to locate but well worth the hunt.

Duke Ellington 'Piano in the Background' Beautifully recorded, swinging Ellington from 1960 with some arrangements by Gerald Wilson. Crank it way up for 'Mainstem' and let the chills run up and down your spine. Wow!

Two new re-releases: Serge Chaloff 'Blue Serge' One of the most beautiful jazz albums ever for my money. 'I Talk With the Spitits' from Roland Kirk, all flute and lots of fun.




Date: 17-Nov-1998 22:22:34
From: Bryan Zuraw ( bzuraw@ucla.edu )
Some current and some lasting favorites: Louis Moholo—Spirits Rejoice (Ogun) not available on CD the drummer from the Blue Notes, a group of S. African exiles who set up in London in the 60's. this late 70's recording features some of the best British musicians—Evan parker, etc.—playing gorgeous music with a deep groove. Bern Nix—Alarms and Excursions (New World Countercurrents)the guitarist from Ornette Coleman's Prime Time, playing in a trio with Fred Hopkins and Reggie Nicholson. the sound is much more open and 'light' than Prime Time, but the music is satisfyingly knotty. Misha Mengelberg—Who's Bridge (AVANT) my favorite piano trio record. A conventional setup that Mengelberg keeps driving off the rails. And, the tunes actually stick in yr head. Gil Melle—Patterns in Jazz (Blue Note) baritone/trombone/guitar/bass and drums, with Ed Thigpen, Oscar Pettiford, Eddie Bert and Joe Cinderella. Compositions that straddle bop and cool, and a lovely, low-end emphasis. This was recently reissued on CD as part of the Complete Gil Melle Blue Note Fifties Sessions, all of which is good. Ab Baars—Sprok (geestgronden) a dutch saxophonist i trio. i really like his sound and the writing, for a trio, is heady chamber jazz—inspired more by Cage or Cowell than Mozart. Art Tatum—God is in the House (High Note) this was just issued on CD. Some of Tatum's music is too richly decorated for my taste, but this is fantastic—relaxed, never fussy. They're recordings made in after hours clubs, so the sound isn't crystal-clear. Steve Beresford—Signals For Tea( AVANT) this doesn't appeal to conventional jazz tastes—Beresford's singing isn't much. but he plays a set of silly songs with dry wit and precision accompaniment by the members of Masada. Ruby Braff/Dick Hyman—I've been enjoying both Fireworks (inner City- Hyman on piano) and America the Beautiful (Concord? -Hyman on pipe organ). melodic improvisations on standards and some classical pieces.


Date: 19-Nov-1998 17:41:18
From: Jim Hendrickson
Enjoyed reading all the comments. Sherman is a hell of a drummer. Here's some I've not seen mentioned but like......Lou Donaldson/Best of (Vol. I or II) I was listening to some of this today, good choices The Quiet Side of John Coltrane.....nothing far out, a thoughtful anthology, great stuff, my favor- ite J.C. The new trio and quartet reissues of 60"s Grant Green stuff. G.G. was a guitarist, more of a single note line player. A lot of fine playing on these two. The new Burton/Corea/Metheny has nice moments.


Date: 19-Nov-1998 17:57:34
From: Jim Hendrickson
I'm not so good at this.Sherman, by the way, is a fine drummer. OK...Best of Lou Donaldson(vol I and II). The new trio and quartet reissues of 60's guitarist Grant Green, lot's of fine playing that was new to me.The Gentle(quiet?) Side of John Coltrane, a thoughtful and not far out anthology, a treasure.Lately I've enjoyed the Concord anthology of Barney Kessel. The new Burton/ Corea/Metheny disc has some nice moments.


Date: 20-Nov-1998 17:12:14
From: Dave Nathan ( dnathan18@hotmail.com )
Dare I add a vocalist to this list? I suggest anything by Irene Kral. Two of her wonderful albums include those she made with Alan Bradbent and Junior Mance.

A nonvocal entrant is "I Concentate on You" with Lee Konitz and Red Mitchell.


Date: 21-Nov-1998 23:22:52
From: Dave Hughes ( jazz_fanatic@hotmail.com )
Here's a few CDs (I've limited it to CDs for this posting) of a more contemporary nature that even some of you straight-ahead jazz lovers might enjoy:

Flim & the BBs, "Big Notes" (DMP)—Recorded live in the studio (no overdubs), direct to digital tape. It's creative, playful and spontaneous, with phenomenal musicianship. This band has a style and personality all its own. Their "Tunnel" album runs a close second.

Manteca, "Extra Extra" (Nova)—This is a compilation disc from one of jazz's most exciting and underrated bands. The Toronto-based band consists of two trumpets, two saxophones, two percussionists, drums, keys, bass. Nova is out of business now, so this CD may be difficult to find. Their newest, a live album called "No Net" (Justin Time) is still available and is also good.

Othello Molineaux, "It's About Time" (Big World)—Andy Narell isn't the only master of the steel drums. Othello has numerous sideman credits, but this is his only headliner effort I'm aware of. Lots of musical ground covered here, and lots of great guest musicians.

Matt Catingub, "I'm Getting Cement All Over Ewe" (Seabreeze)—Actually, any of his big band CDs are great, including his new "Gershwin 100." Humorous arranging and incredible musicianship.

Finally, two "L.A. meets Brasil" efforts; probably difficult to find but worth the effort: "Velas" (Voss)—John Pisano (guitar) and Jose Marino (bass) are the headliners, and Yutaka produces. A cast of mostly L.A. studio pros, plus Dori Caymmi, Justo Almario, and Kevyn Lettau (vocals).

L.A. Transit, "De Novo" (Denon)—Half L.A., half Brasilian, all excellent.

Enjoy!


Date: 25-Nov-1998 14:30:05
From: jack hollfelder ( mingus5053@aol.com )
Three quick choices (because these are in my desk drawer) and have access to here at work. Wynton Kelly Trio & Sextet ---- Kelly Blue Duke Ellington ---- The Afro-Eurasian Eclipse Tina Brooks ---- True Blue


Date: 02-Dec-1998 18:53:50
From: Craig Pinson ( gcraig@asu.uswest.net )
As my tastes in Jazz evolves it has become apparent that there is no one style I prefer over another.After all, Duke Ellington said it best. There are two kinds of music, GOOD music, and the rest. I guess I`m just saying it`s all good My selections for the moment are: 1}The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions-Miles Davis. It`s Beautiful, Frightening, Complex, and Bluesy all at once, but it`s also Miles at his best. 2}Complete Jazz at the Philharmonic-Various Artists. Thanks to Verve for letting me feel like I was at the the Greatest Jam Sessions ever. 3} La Scala-Keith Jarrett. Incredible piano from one it`s masters. 4} Jazz at Oberlin-Dave Brubeck. The best Paul Desmond ever recorded. A daring move at the time, but proved Jazz wasan incredible art form. 5} Complete Duke Ellington & Ella Fitzgerald at Cote de Azur. Once again, thanks to Verve. An incredible collection. 6} Turn Out the Stars-Bill Evans. He makes you feel every emotion with his playing. A true genius. 7} Giant Steps- John Coletrane. To listen is to hear spirituality as art. 8} Habana-Roy Hargrove. Keep it low or your speakers will burn.

That`s only a partial list. Sorry for the inclusion of so many Box sets, but they are like finding gold. P.S. I almost forgot. The Complete Quintet Recordings 1965-1968- Miles Davis. The talent in this group is still breath taking.


Date: 03-Dec-1998 15:08:02
From: John ( blueice@umich.edu )
Hello everyone...

I just stumbled across this website today and thoroughly enjoyed reading the posts on this topic. Like most, I'm a big fan of "the usual suspects" when it comes to Monk, Miles, Dizzy, 'Trane, etc, but here are a few of my lesser known must haves:

Clifford Jordan (SPELLBOUND)—A straight-ahead post-bop 1960 quartet recording with Jordan's tenor out front. Available on OJC/Riverside. Upbeat Jordan originals led by the outstanding "Toy" and a couple of standards including a waltzy verson of "Lush Life."

Anthony Braxton—Any of his recordings devoted to another artist's material. I've yet to truly grasp Braxton playing Braxton, but I couldn't do without SIX MONK'S COMPOSITIONS (1987) on Black Saint, EIGHT (+3) TRISTANO COMPOSITIONS 1989 FOR WARNE MARSH and CHARLIE PARKER PROJECT 1993, both on Hat. Braxton's main horn is alto and the three above titles are quartet, quintet and sextet, respectively. The Parker double-CD is somewhat more creative/out than the others, but I find all of them to be fairly accessible and very passionate.

Buell Neidlinger (BLUE CHOPSTICKS)—A quintet recording of Herbie Nichols' compositions featuring nothing but horns and strings, with bassist Neidlinger sticking to cello. An acquired taste, but truly beautiful if you find it to your liking. And the digipak packaging is to die for...why aren't all CDs packaged this well?!

Without going into detail, I also enjoy John Zorn's Masada albums (the studio ones), everything I've heard featuring Bill Holman's arrangements and Phineas Newborn Jr's trio recordings on OJC/Contemporary...including A WORLD OF PIANO, mentioned in a couple of previous posts.

Thanks for letting me chip in my thoughts.


Date: 04-Dec-1998 06:21:45
From: Jos? Domingos Raffaelli ( jdr@musicshop.com.br )
Jonathan Kranz,

Sorry for my delay about the TCB albums. I was not well succeeded to give you all informations, but here is what I got after some weeks (in between I went to New York, but this is another story).

TCB-1001—Title: Gettin'It Together—Yusef Lateef, Freddie Hubbard, Curtis Fuller, Walter Bishop Jr., Buddy Catlett and Stu Martin.

Tunes: Chantized / Flutie / If I Were A Bell / But Beautiful / Do I Love You ? / The Court / Mr. L /

Warwick W50038 ST—Title: The Soul of Jazz Percussion Collective personnel: Booker Little, Donald Byrd, Don Ellis and Marcus Belgrave (trumpets) // Curtis Fuller (trombone // Pepper Adams (baritone sax) // Mal Waldron and Bill Evans (piano) // Paul Chambers and Addison Farmer (bass) // Philly Joe Jones and Eddie Shaughnessy (drums) // Willie Rodriguez, Armando Perazza and Earl; Zindars (percussion)

Tunes: Construction Crew (Waldron) Ping Pong Beer (Evans/Chambers/Philly Joe) Call To Arms (Waldron) Witch-Fire (Booker Little) November Afternoon (Tom McIntosh) Chasin' The Bird (Charlie Parker) Prophecy (Alonzo Levister) Quiet Temple (Waldron) Wee-Tina (Shaughnessy)

But I'm still looking informations about the Donald Byrd album.


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