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Jazz Primer

Great, but obscure albums to purchase

By Published: December 9, 2004
(If you are a true jazz enthusiast and a serious LP and CD collector and do not own a copy of the *All Music Guide to Jazz*, I strongly suggest that you go out and buy this book—look for the 3rd edition. Also, do any of you subscribe to Cadance magazine? If so, please let me know how you like it!




Date: 03-Jan-1999 08:56:53
From: Israel Waldrop ( esroh@juno.com )
There are several great LP's that Dizzy Gillespie recorded for Verve and Philips in the early 60's which are very underated due to the fact that they have'nt been reissued on CD. These include: An Electifying Evening with the Dizzy Gillespie Quintet (which I miraculously found at a used record shop for $3!!), Dizzy on the French Riviera, and New Wave.

Here's what Scott Yanow of the *All Music Guide to Jazz* has to say about New Wave: "it is such a pity that Dizzy Gillespie Philip's LPs have yet to be reissued on CD, for the trumpeter (45 at the time of this recording)was at the peak of his powers in the early 60's."

As we all know, Dizzy Gillespie was one of the most beloved jazz musicians/personalities and one of America's most renowned artists. If only those big record labels would take a hint and take on the project of reissuing these LP's they would not only realize how satisfied jazz enthusiasts would be but also make huge profits.

(If you are a true jazz enthusiast and a serious LP and CD collector and do not own a copy of the *All Music Guide to Jazz*, I strongly suggest that you go out and buy this book—look for the 3rd edition. Also, do any of you subscribe to Cadance magazine? If so, please let me know how you like it!




Date: 06-Jan-1999 04:09:50
From: Gnecco
Thanks to Larkin for including Tom Waits. The Ellington/Armstrong sessions is magic, top to bottom. (anyone know how to get it on vinyl?)

Check out Scofield's "Grace Under Pressure" with Bill frisell, charlie haden, and joey baron. It's some straight ahead bop and some pretty stuff on two guitars. Frisell's playing is tasteful and sensitive-a nice change from his out there solo stuff.

Joey Baron's band Baron Down, the album "Tongue in Groove" This is the coolest drummer playing, with a trombone and a sax. It's playful and exhuberant.

Anything from John Zorn's Masada. The albums are numbered 1 -13, I think. Its Zorn, Baron, Greg Cohen on Bass, and Dave Douglass on Trumpet. It mixes frenetic bop playing from contemporary masters, in the context of traditional Klezmer.

Zorn's Spy vs. Spy album is an intense rendition of Ornette's stuff played on two alto saxophones, two drum kits and a bass. It's like being in traffic on speed.

Something about Mike Stern's rendition of "Like Someone in Love" on his "Standards" album has stuck with me every day, even though I lost the cd years ago. It has become definitive of the tune for me.

Indeed, the early Benson is marvelous.


Date: 09-Jan-1999 11:31:54
From: Peter Schellenberg ( pschellenberg@access.ch )
WHITE JAZZ Casa Loma Band JUMPIN'PUNKINS Ellington (Webster/Blanton) JOHN KIRBY SEXTET 1940 JAZZ OF TWO CITIES Warne Marsh/Ted Brown AMBASSADOR SATCH /WESTEND BLUES Louis Armstrong THE WORLD OF CECIL TAYLOR STUDY IN BROWN Clifford Brown OUT TO LUNCH Eric Dolphy KIND OF BLUE Miles Davis LES JAZZ MODES Julius Watkins / Charlie Rouse


Date: 14-Jan-1999 00:05:08
From: Garry E.
Bill Barron/Booker Ervin—"The Hot Line": Interesting contrast of two excellent saxophonists (the late Bill is Kenny's brother), and some of this just burns! Reissued on Savoy about 10 years ago.

Bob Brookmeyer and Friends: A nice Columbia LP from, I believe, the early '60's, with Stan Getz and Elvin Jones among others.

Don Cherry—"Complete Communion": Fascinating music, Cherry's first (and in my opinion best) Blue Note with Gato Barbieri occupying the chair later taken by Pharaoh Sanders. Gato was more "out" at this point (mid '60's) than he later became, but was not nearly the screecher that Sanders then was. Cherry's "Art Deco" on A&M from the late '80's is also a very tasty straight jazz set—something of a surprise from this late lamented master of world music.

Stanley Cowell—"Brilliant Circles": Excellent, especially the title track. Cowell, I believe, is a very underrated and versatile pianist. On his late '70's Galaxy solo LP "Waiting for the Moment" he shows just HOW versatile he is: the album apparently aspires to be a history of jazz piano to that point, beginning with ragtime and ending with electric piano/fusion material. Though this arguably gives the sequence of songs too rigid a "timeline" kind of feeling, it's still both impressive and enjoyable.

Ron Crotty/Jerry Dodgion/Vince Guaraldi—"Modern Music from San Francisco": This is great, if you can find it. Three different leaders split the album, which may be why (as far as I know) it's never been on CD. Actually, even though he's only a sideman here, I think Sonny Clark's piano steals the show when he gets a chance at the spotlight.


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