Amazon.com Widgets

Musings on Jazz, Blues and the Sabbath

By Published: | 3,312 views
Sneddon's alto seems to constantly switch between playing with and playing against the bass and drums. In several tunes, like "Into the Sky," the rhythm drops completely away to leave saxophone whispering and whistling alone in a dark sonic graveyard; in others, like "The Masque of the Red Death," alto swaps roles with bass to flow through more melodic playing churned by sharp bass improvisation. Bassist Stewart strums more reflectively to begin the not quite as vicious as it sounds "No One Fucking Posts to the UAE" before rocking its rhythm back and forth so solidly that it frees Sneddon to play wherever and however she pleases.

Doomjazz/Giganticus concludes with music written by or in honor of Domenico Scarlatti, Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
Sonny Rollins
b.1930
saxophone
and Black Sabbath. Stewart plays walking lines so fast they turn "K54" (inspired by Scarlatti's "Sonata K54") into a tumbling run timed by Archibald's whipcrack snare and closed in a lovely coda. "Saxophone Giganticus" repeats its blues stomp over and over until its sound seems to grow monstrously big and deep, like Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
b.1964
band/orchestra
nursing an electric blues grudge. They close with Sneddon abstractly sketching the leadoff and ultimate track from Black Sabbath's eponymous 1970 debut (Warner Bros.).

What, no "21st Century Schizoid Man"?

Jazz is sometimes criticized by fans of other musical styles for being too intellectual and not as visceral as blues or rock can be. Free Nelson Mandoomjazz shatters that criticism to pieces with rhythms that rip from deep and powerful places, and land so hard in your ears that you feel their punch in your guts.

Live at the Gallery Elias Haslanger
Elias Haslanger
Elias Haslanger
b.1969
sax, tenor

Live at the Gallery
Cherrywood
2014

Live at the Gallery boasts rollicking, soulful performances of a first-class set list recorded live and hot onstage at a packed jazz club in Austin (Texas) led by Texas native, Austin resident and tenor saxophonist Elias Haslanger and featuring soloists Dr. James Polk
Dr. James Polk
Dr. James Polk
b.1940
piano
(another native Texan and former organist, pianist, writer, arranger and conductor for Ray Charles
Ray Charles
Ray Charles
1930 - 2004
piano
) on Hammond B-3 organ and Jake Langley on guitar.

Haslanger, who studied at the Manhattan School of Music, the University of Texas and Southwest Texas State University (when he received the DownBeat Student Music Award for College Outstanding Tenor Saxophone Performance), straddles the US east coast / Midwest tenor sounds. "New York was obviously a great learning experience but I'm more comfortable, personally and musically, back in Austin," he allows. "I think that's given me more confidence to develop my own sound and use it to explore new types of music." In 2013, Haslanger was short-listed by the Texas Commission on the Arts for the role of State Musician of Texas, an honor previously bestowed on such artists as Lyle Lovett
Lyle Lovett
Lyle Lovett
b.1957
guitar
and Willie Nelson.

"One for Daddy O," from Julian "Cannonball" Adderley
Julian
Julian "Cannonball" Adderley
1928 - 1975
saxophone
's landmark Somethin' Else (1958, Blue Note) opens Live at the Gallerywith great feeling and sound—a little funk, a little blues, a little bounce and a ton of soul. Next, Polk's B-3 creeps into "Watermelon Man" (Herbie Hancock
Herbie Hancock
Herbie Hancock
b.1940
piano
) to quickly introduce solos by Haslanger, whose tenor burns like a Texas brushfire, and Langley, who seems to channel Grant Green
Grant Green
Grant Green
1935 - 1979
guitar
or Ivan Boogaloo Jones or a comparable soul-jazz guitar ace. Haslanger's hot runs through "Watermelon Man," "I Thought About You" and "Adam's Apple" (by Wayne Shorter
Wayne Shorter
Wayne Shorter
b.1933
saxophone
) sound like lost classics from Prestige Records' tenor/B-3 soul jazz catalog, including and especially Sonny Stitt
Sonny Stitt
Sonny Stitt
1924 - 1982
saxophone
's extensive recordings with Don Patterson
Don Patterson
Don Patterson
1936 - 1988
organ, Hammond B3
.

Or, if you prefer, Haslanger's take on Horace Silver
Horace Silver
Horace Silver
1928 - 2014
piano
's timeless "Song for My Father" sounds so much like Stanley Turrentine
Stanley Turrentine
Stanley Turrentine
1934 - 2000
sax, tenor
playing this tune in the funky Blue Note Records company of guitarist Grant Green
Grant Green
Grant Green
1935 - 1979
guitar
and Dr. Lonnie Smith
Dr. Lonnie Smith
Dr. Lonnie Smith
b.1942
organ, Hammond B3
on B-3. Haslanger sounds soulful, blue and hot, stretching out his lines across several bars and then blistering the melody with hot staccato. In "Goin' Down," a favorite of Texas blues guitar ace Stevie Ray Vaughan
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Stevie Ray Vaughan
1954 - 1990
guitar
, the saxophonist does more than sing—he testifies—the blues!

If you've ever wondered what Eddie Harris
Eddie Harris
Eddie Harris
1934 - 1994
saxophone
, Billy Butler
Billy Butler
b.1925
and Jimmy Smith
Jimmy Smith
Jimmy Smith
1925 - 2005
organ, Hammond B3
might sound like jamming together in heaven, now you know. Live at the Gallery is simply a great live set.

Road Scholars Live Stan Kenton Alumni Band
Road Scholars Live
Summit
2014

For more than twenty years, the Stan Kenton
Stan Kenton
Stan Kenton
1911 - 1979
piano
Alumni Band has kept the pulse of big-band jazz strongly beating through regular touring under the direction of trumpet master Mike Vax
Mike Vax
Mike Vax

trumpet
, who served as the Orchestra's first trumpet, soloist and road manager (and also spent one year leading The Dukes of Dixieland, a genuine New Orleans musical treasure) before assuming leadership of the Stan Kenton Alumni Band.


comments powered by Disqus
Search
Support All About Jazz Through Amazon

Weekly Giveaways

Mark Elf

Mark Elf

About | Enter

Stefano Bollani

Stefano Bollani

About | Enter

Carmen Lundy

Carmen Lundy

About | Enter

Wadada Leo Smith

Wadada Leo Smith

About | Enter

Bandzoogle: GET STARTED TODAY - FREE TRIAL

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.

Article Search