Musings on Jazz, Blues and the Sabbath

By Published: | 4,026 views
Margie Baker Sings with So Many Stars Margie Baker
Sings With So Many Stars
Consolidated Artists Productions
2014

Margie Baker didn't begin her career as a jazz and blues vocalist in the San Francisco area until she was nearly 40, but she made up for this delayed entry with endurance: She was often featured at the Monterey Jazz Festival and as in Festival road shows led by Richie Cole
Richie Cole
Richie Cole
b.1948
sax, alto
and the legendary James Moody
James Moody
James Moody
1925 - 2010
reeds
(for whom Baker penned "Mood for Mr. Moody"). Baker also became one of Dizzy Gillespie
Dizzy Gillespie
Dizzy Gillespie
1917 - 1993
trumpet
's favorite vocalists and sat in with his band whenever she could—"He was my mentor until the day he died," she once recalled.

This two-CD retrospective celebrates not only Baker (now on the other side of 80) but also her devotion to the San Francisco Bay area that she served as a public school district educator and administrator for 48 years. She's joined in this celebration by So Many Stars from "Margie's musical galaxy," as she calls them, such as guitarist Rodney Jones
Rodney Jones
Rodney Jones
b.1956
guitar
, bassist/trombonist Chuck Bennett and percussionist John Santos
John Santos
John Santos
b.1955
percussion
, one of Baker's sixth grade students! "This is a tribute to them," Baker explains. "These are not egocentric, big-time musicians, but they're wonderful musicians. We work so much and so well together." (You can still occasionally hear Baker sing during Sunday brunch at the Hyatt Regency Hotel near San Francisco International Airport.)

With So Many Stars, Baker embodies a uniquely personal, warm and living history of popular, jazz and blues. Walking bass and rocking piano bounce her voice like a rubber ball through "Every Day I Have the Blues," and she swaggers through "Gee Baby (Ain't I Good to You?)" atop electric piano, like Etta James
Etta James
Etta James
1938 - 2012
vocalist
on an exceptionally sassy day. Disc one closes with Baker, bassist Bennett and pianist Keith Williams amplifying the Latin funk and jazz in Horace Silver
Horace Silver
Horace Silver
1928 - 2014
piano
's classic "Señor Blues."

But Baker's voice dances in shadows, too. The darkness of Thelonious Monk
Thelonious Monk
Thelonious Monk
1917 - 1982
piano
's meditation "'Round Midnight" illuminates all the weariness in a voice that's perfect for pulling out ache and wonder. Her rendition of "Go Away Little Boy" is the polar opposite of Donny Osmond's 1971 chart-topper in every imaginable way—resigned and worn, as Baker simply flattens out and elongates higher notes that her voice might not be able to otherwise reach.

Baker dedicates this version of "Mood for Mister Moody" to Moody's wife and daughter. When she sings, "I wanna move/ I wanna groove/ Come on and blow," the band—especially saxophonist Jules Broussard—sure takes up her invitation.

Baker's voice doesn't always find the right note right away. But it always finds, as "In a Mellow Tone," the softest pocket of a song's rhythm. If you're focused on pristine, pitch-perfect readings, Margie Baker Sings With So Many Stars is not for you. But if you want to listen to music that spills over with jazz and blues emotion, and genuinely feel the empathy between a singer and her supporting ensemble, it's a great set.

Puerta del Sur Bio Ritmo
Puerta del Sur
VampiSoul Records
2014

Bio Ritmo has kept the salsa flame burning for more than twenty years. "We all share a passion for salsa, a music that encompasses so many different styles and influences," explains producer, composer, pianist and bandleader Marlysse Simmons. "It's rooted in the experimentation of blending rhythms and sounds and this is exactly what we love to do."

"Our mission from day one was to write original music in the classic salsa style," concurs lead composer and vocalist Rei Alvarez, "and experimentation is as much a part of the tradition as the wide-ranging Afro-Cuban genres that it's based on."

Much of Puerta del Sur sounds and feels like you've plugged into a salsa-charged power outlet. "Picaresca" is utterly flawless in design and execution, and bursts open with brilliant musicality from all the piano, trumpet, timbales and trombone blossoming like a salsa hothouse flower. "Motocilengua" sounds a little more languid but no less hot, a dance groove crackling with Latin piano, percussion and vocals.

The big-band ballad "Perdido" elegantly dances, stately yet lively behind its twin, harmonized lead vocals, a traditional salsa sound that serves as the fulcrum for Puerta Del Sur. Bob Miller's trumpet solo scorches the sky while piano, bass, drums and percussion interlock and prance in the finest Latin traditions—classic, contemporary or slightly unconventional.


comments powered by Disqus
Sponsor: Summit Records | BUY NOW

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.

or search site with Google