Amazon.com Widgets
31 Recommend It!

The Jason Klobnak Quintet: Mountain, Move (2013)

By Published: | 3,143 views
The Jason Klobnak Quintet: Mountain, Move "The Jazz Mainstream" is a sub-genre that has, by necessity, changed with the music's evolution. During the 1910s and '20s, New Orleans and Chicago ruled the mainstream, while the '30s and '40s belonged to big band swing. With the twilight of the big bands, combos shrunk to quartet and quintet size and bebop burned brightly in the late '40s and early '50s, maybe not becoming the mainstream, but setting it up by sparking the cool movement and hard bop of the '50s and '60s. It was the assimilation of these two movements that became what might be considered the jazz mainstream today. When the popular media chooses a jazz soundtrack, it is the smoky, small-club noir sound heard on the likes of Miles Davis
Miles Davis
Miles Davis
1926 - 1991
trumpet
' first great quintet or Oliver Nelson
Oliver Nelson
Oliver Nelson
1932 - 1975
arranger
's The Blues and The Abstract Truth (Impulse!, 1961). When this music is heard, there is no mistaking that it is jazz.

In the second decade of the 21st Century, what might be considered "Jazz Mainstream"? A strong case could be made for trumpeter Jason Klobnak's Mountain, Move. Firmly established in the vein of hard bop, Klobnak has assembled a traditional hard bop quintet of a rhythm section fronted with trumpet and tenor saxophone. His compositions are very much in the sub-genre's mold with complex yet melodic heads followed by integrated solo space. What Klobnak brings new to the table are pieces more carefully arranged, avoiding the freewheeling blowing session characteristic of the '50s and '60s. That live type of recording had its place in jazz's evolution but now gives way to a more thoughtful production paradigm that has manifested ever since.

Klobnak's music reveals careful study of all that has come before. His compositions possess razor precision, placing emphasis on his pieces' harmonic underpinnings, affording a solid ground upon which to solo. The opening "Back and Forth" is based on a breezy give-and-take theme that transforms seamlessly into a sonic palette from which the soloist (Klobnak, pianist Jonathan Parker
Jonathan Parker
Jonathan Parker
b.1986
sax, alto
and bassist Ian Hutchison) can fully expand their musical ideas into all corners of the composition. The title piece takes elements of David Sanborn
David Sanborn
David Sanborn
b.1945
saxophone
's brand of R&B, the Crusaders' churchy approach to ballads, and the Saturday Night Live "Closing Theme (A Waltz in A)," by Howard Shore. Klobnak masterfully uses the music's drama to build an impressive climax and coda. And so goes the rest of the recording.

Klobnak's ear is very acute in guiding his aural vision of jazz. Mountain, Move is an exceptional recording that bristles with creativity and inventiveness, all within the confines of consonant jazz.


Track Listing: Back & Forth; He’s Still Here; Mountain, Move; Jardin des Tuileries; Where Would I Go; Sego; Back To The End; Stand Firm; U.L.T. (Undetermined Length of Time).

Personnel: Jason Klobnak: trumpet; Elijah Samuels: tenor saxophone; Jon Parker: piano, B3 organ; Ian Hutchison: bass; Paul Mullikin: drums.

Record Label: Self Produced

Style: Modern Jazz


comments powered by Disqus

Weekly Giveaways

Roscoe Mitchell

Roscoe Mitchell

About | Enter

Peter Lerner

Peter Lerner

About | Enter

Jamie Saft

Jamie Saft

About | Enter

Sun Trio

Sun Trio

About | Enter

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW