Marco Eneidi: Still Here

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Alto saxophonist Marco Eneidi is one of contemporary creative music's unsung heroes. He studied with Jimmy Lyons and Sonny Simmons and has played and recorded with illustrious musicians including Bill Dixon, Cecil Taylor, William Parker and Glenn Spearman.

Each of his albums is a special treat. Despite a significant discography ranging from trio to large orchestra to his name, Eneidi's work suffers from an inexplicable obscurity. That's a loss not only for the artist but for music lovers who haven't experienced this beautiful music only because the media failed to wise them up to its existence.

I took the opportunity to speak to the man in question on my radio show, Taran's Free Jazz Hour, this past October 8. Hopefully this excerpt of the interview will whet readers' appetite to experience Marco Eneidi's art.



All About Jazz: Hi Marco, we just listened to "Baby Please Don't Go" from the album American Roadwork...

Marco Eneidi: (humming) "Baby please don't go back to New Orleans, cause I love you so ...and now we all know what happened to New Orleans.

AAJ: I was wondering how it came about, the song of course, and the whole idea of a blues album?

ME: Well, that's pretty funny, but it just turned out that way and that particular piece which we did not do while we were on tour—where we did 32 concerts in 40 days and drove some 16000 kilometers—that was Lisle Ellis's suggestion, and the day before we made the recording we rehearsed that piece a little bit and then we went into the recording. My roots are the blues, I grew up listening to the blues, to the rock'n'roll San Francisco scene of the late 1960s and '70s. Then I learned about the Mississippi delta blues. Yeah my roots are the blues and it made sense to do that piece.

AAJ: I read in your biography that you played the guitar in the finger-picking style of the blues.

ME: I was a terrible guitarist, I played at the guitar I did not play it.

AAJ: Let's take it from the beginning, tell us about your background, in what kind of an environment did you grow up, did you belong to a family of artists?

ME: My father is a scientist. he was also a skier, you know a ski-racer, and both him and my mother were skiers and they met in Portland, Oregon in the mountain and they got married. He was scientist and got a job down in California working at the Lawrence Livermore laboratory which back then was called the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, the Rad lab which was the biggest place in America for making nuclear bombs and CIA funded and was a small cow town about 60 km outside of San Francisco. A small redneck and quite racist cow town but also half the population were the top scientists in the world and that's where are grew up, so no, it was not an artistic family and for me if I'd have gone into science and maths that would have been quite easy for me 'cause it comes easy to me those things. Music was very difficult for me, and it took a lot of time and effort to learn how to play—not only the music but to play the saxophone, this piece of metal that you blow into and make sounds come out of. In 1981, when I was 24, almost 25 I moved to New York and stayed there for almost 14 years, around NY and New England. Then I went back to California where I stayed for seven years and now I live in Vienna, in Wien (Vienna) Austria. I've been here almost one year—in three weeks it'll be one year. And I love being in Europe and am really happy to be the hell out of America, I must say that.

AAJ: I am curious to know about your life as a creative musician in the US.

ME: In the US there's no support for artists and you have to do something else to live so I drove a taxi. For several years I was a bicycle messenger, I did a lot of construction work, asbestos removal, and worked in restaurants, and taught for a little while, and was broke for a long time, this and that. The best thing about coming to Europe—the one reason I came to Vienna, to Wien—is that the cost of living is much cheaper here than San Francisco or New York, for the rent and everything else; and you actually get paid to play music here, you actually make some money, whereas in California and San Francisco you go and play and after you spend your money to buy reeds for the saxophone and gas to get across the bridge and this and that, you end up losing money. You play for one night and only ten or so people show up and you make 20 dollars but it cost you 25 to go there and play, whereas here, you actually get paid a little bit of money.

Europe has its problems—its history, its politics—as does America, has a long history of racism and blood shedding past and present history that America is doing now. Where I am right now is outside Vienna about 60 km to the east on the Hungarian border, in the little village of Nickelsdorf at the house of Hans Falbe—the Nickelsdorf jazz gallery. It's a small little village which looks like the [American] mid-west, looks like Nebraska or Iowa, and all these boys here they're farmers by daytime and they come in for their beer afterwards. Unlike America, here you deal with the kind of environment where you can talk to anybody about anything intelligent. The farmers come in and you can talk about politics, you can talk about the Green Party politics and about music and they know it all; it's really a breath of fresh air for me to be here, I must say it's really quite nice.

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