Jazz Nicknames

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Slang is definitely cool, but other non-musical aspects, like nicknames, have created a certain allure or attraction to Jazz, too. Nicknames, especially the stories behind them, are fun, sometimes funny, and other times fascinating.

The immortal Louis Armstrong had at least three of them. Even before jazz was officially a musical form, forerunners of it, such as Charles "Buddy" Bolden, had nicknames. In fact, it seems that the bigger the artist, the quicker he or she gained a nickname.

This list contains a few of those nicknames; if you know of any others or can expand upon the reasons for a given nickname, please send them to us.

Adderley, Julian Edwin --- Cannonball

Actually, Adderley's original nickname was "Cannibal" because of his eating habits. "Cannonball" is merely a bastardization of "Cannibal" and is still a good fit.

Ammons, Gene --- Jug

Not sure why the tenor saxophonist was called "Jug." If you know the source of this nickname, please let us know. A reader says that Gene was called "Jug" because he could drink anyone under the table.

Armstrong, Louis --- Dipper Mouth, Satchel Mouth, Satchmo, Gate

King Oliver and other early jazz musicians called Louis "Dipper Mouth" or "Satchel Mouth," presumably because of his large mouth. Early in the thirties, Louis visited England and was given his trademark handle "Satchmo" when British fans heard the "Satchel Mouth" tag incorrectly. Billie Holiday called him "Pops." Gate was also used to designate Armstrong at some point.

According to Louis' own book "Satchmo, My Life In New Orleans" reprinted by Ace Books in 1957 (originally published 1955), "Dipper...(that was my nickname—short for Dippermouth, from the piece called Dippermouth Blues)." It would appear that the name was given to him after the tune which he evidently liked when he was very young. -Bruce Barnett

Baker, Chesney H. --- Chet

Chet was probably just a derivation of the Cool trumpeter's first name. If his parents didn't bestow this nickname on Chet, he probably did himself at an early age.

Basie, William --- Count

In his autobiography, "Good Morning Blues," he writes that he wanted to become part of the "jazz royalty of the time"—among them Duke Ellington, King Oliver, Earl Hines and Baron Lee—so he took the name 'Count.' This was in the late 1920s.

Beiderbecke, Leon --- Bix

As an astute reader puts it, "Bix's real name was Leon Bismarck Beiderbecke. That is well documented in the Bix Beiderbecke "bible" by Sudhalter et al: "Bix—man and legend." In that book there is a discussion of several pages and a photo of his death attest, where his real name is written.

The name Bismarck came from his father, who somethimes was named Bix, perhaps that's the reason why Bix was christianed Bix."

Berry, Leon --- Chu

Chu Berry resembled a character from a musical called "Chu Chin Chow."

Bertholoff, William Henry Joseph Berthol Bonaparte --- Willie "the Lion" Smith

Willie Smith was probably used to shorten the extremely long name. "The Lion" was bestowed because of Willie's forceful manner.

Or, as another reader puts it: he was called "The Lion" because of his devotion to Israel.

Blakey, Art --- Bu

Art Blakey was sometimes called "Bu," which was short for his Muslim name, Abdullah Ibn Buhaina.

Bolden, Charles --- Buddy

"Buddy" Bolden was reputed to be the first Jazz cornetist. If you know where this nickname came from, let us know.

Breitenfeld, Paul --- Paul Desmond

Desmond reportedly picked his name out of a phone book.

Brown, Clarence --- Gatemouth

Gatemouth was obviously derived from "Gator" mouth. "Alligator" was what jazz musicians called each other prior to adopting to "cat." "Hey Gate!" was a common salutation.

Brown, Clifford --- Brownie .


It is no great mystery why Clifford Brown was called "Brownie."

Byrd, Henry Roeland --- Professor Longhair, Fess, Roy

Not sure why this colorful New Orleans pre-rock pianist was called "Professor Longhair." "Fess" was a shortened form of "Professor Longhair" and "Roy" probably came from Roeland.

Clayton, Wilbur --- Buck

Clayton's nickname was given to him by his mother in reference to his African American ancestors according to a reader.

Coltrane, John --- Trane

Coltrane's nickname, "Trane," was a shortening of his last name.

Davis, Eddie --- Lockjaw

It is rumoured that Eddie was heavily "endowed." Possibly he caused a few cases of "Lockjaw" amongst his admirers?

Davis recorded a few titles named after more or less incommodating diseases in the late 1940's. "Lockjaw" was later shortened to "Jaws." -Dirk Ludigkeit

Davis, Miles --- The Prince of Darkness In reference to Davis' aloof brooding play on stage; it's often cited how he would turn his back to the audience.

Dodds, Warren --- Baby

New Orleans drummer Warren Dodds may have been called "Baby" because he was six years younger than his brother clarinetist Johnny Dodds.

Dorham, McKinley --- Kinny / Kenny

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