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Jason Robinson: The New Western

Jason Robinson: The New Western
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It seems like the industry prefers that you're [either] very experimental or more mainstream. And the in-between is not the normal route, even though most of us live in the in-between.
Saxophonist Jason Robinson is alert and ready to work his place in the scheme of things, from jazz itself to music at large, to the existential particulars of philosophy. A supple technician with a penchant for abstract thought, he splices together different strains of theory and logic with combinatory takes on period, school and style. A deeply ingrained reverence and sense for jazz history comes out in his carefully calibrated, often composed body of multivalent, multicolored music. Equally informed by history and theory, philosophy and feeling, he courses swiftly between rough and smooth, hard and soft, hot and—being Californian—cool.

All About Jazz: Are you hot or cool?

Jason Robinson: In terms of style?

AAJ: However you want to take the question.

JR: Being from California it's a little loaded [laughs]. Being from California, in general, one of the things that has been very present is this notion of West Coast jazz, or cool jazz. I'm from northern California and I came of age musically in the San Francisco scene. The music that I was making, when younger, has more in common with hard bop of the '50s, stuff that was more associated with the East Coast. It wasn't just me; most of the musicians on the scene I was part of were more in dialogue with those kinds of things rather than cool jazz. When I was in San Francisco, it was the end of the acid jazz scene or era. The people I was playing with, we were really exploring an intersection between freestyle rap, turntablism; we had groups back then that were, for all intents and purposes, jazz groups, hard-hitting modern hard bop, but in the group we'd also have a freestyle emcee, and someone playing a turntables with us as well—taking solos.

I was also playing a lot of super-straight-ahead stuff, modern bebop. So those were two important poles for me. The cool jazz thing, it was always there, but I've run into very few musicians who were really that into it on the West Coast. It's almost like a specter. It's hard to find. On the West Coast, we're all presented with this history, whether or not it speaks to us. I was more interested in West Coasters like Buddy Collette
Buddy Collette
Buddy Collette
1921 - 2010
sax, tenor
and Horace Tapscott
Horace Tapscott
Horace Tapscott
1934 - 1999
piano
. And there were the equivalent of those people in the Bay Area. Those people spoke to me on a different level than cool jazz did. That and people like Charles Mingus
Charles Mingus
Charles Mingus
1922 - 1979
bass, acoustic
and Dexter Gordon
Dexter Gordon
Dexter Gordon
1923 - 1990
sax, tenor
—they're from California. So I was aware of that history. That gives you a lot to run with.

AAJ: Archaeologically speaking you're very devoted to California and the schools there, the way they intertwined, whether it's Mingus or Dexter Gordon.

JR: Yeah, on a certain level. I'm the product of the communities I came out of, just like everybody else. Now I'm much more of a traveling Californian. There's a certain responsibility I feel towards projecting a kind of vision of what kind of jazz is happening today that is more open. Because there is a lot of amazing stuff that happens there that certainly does not make the New York-oriented jazz press. But it barely makes the press in California itself.

AAJ: Where does your energy come from?

JR: I think from just life, in general. I'm not fully from the Charlie Parker
Charlie Parker
Charlie Parker
1920 - 1955
sax, alto
school of "live it, or it won't come out on your horn." I don't fully believe in that. I tend to draw inspiration for music just from the vicissitudes of life—being a member of different kinds of communities, American—and I also think a part of this jazz continuum is a strong responsibility to the people of the past, on a certain level. But also just the recorded history of the music. I find a lot of inspiration imagining myself as part of a continued evolution of the music. Not that I think of myself in a grand way. But the music is going to stay alive, because we're all here doing it. It's quite inspiring once you start imagining yourself as part of the same stream as other people.

AAJ: Patricia Nicholson said, after a Charles Gayle
Charles Gayle
Charles Gayle
b.1939
saxophone
performance at the Vision Fest this year, "Who said giants don't walk the earth anymore?" We keep thinking of each generation being smaller than the one before it, but who's to say you're not the next Joe Henderson
Joe Henderson
Joe Henderson
1937 - 2001
sax, tenor
?

JR: If I could play one tenth the way Joe Henderson plays I'd consider myself successful.

AAJ: Discipline, humility, respect for the past...

JR: Absolutely. The people I admire in the history of jazz had that humility in the face of tradition.

AAJ: Your music is accessible on the surface. It's not jarring or grating. You can sit back and relax to it. And then as you dig into it so can see the complexity. It doesn't shout out, "We're intellectuals," the way the great Evan Parker
Evan Parker
Evan Parker
b.1944
sax, tenor
might.

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