Amazon.com Widgets

Hugh Laurie & The Copper Bottom Band: New York, NY, September 10, 2012

Hugh Laurie & The Copper Bottom Band: New York, NY, September 10, 2012
By Published: | 20,529 views
Hugh Laurie & The Copper Bottom Band
The Grand Ballroom At Manhattan Center
New York, New York
September 10, 2012
There was a palpable feeling of excited anticipation in the air as the audience filed into New York City's Manhattan Center—Hugh Laurie, known to many as the irrepressible Dr. Gregory House from the hit television series House, was about to perform songs from his debut CD, Let Them Talk (Warner Brothers, 2011). The anticipation, as well as the volume put forth by the crowd grew as the minutes ticked away and the appointed time grew closer. Bathed in red light, the stage was appropriately dressed like what could very well have been an early 20th Century middle-class living room or bordello sitting room filled with musical instruments—a perfect setup for that evening's performance of classic New Orleans and Americana songs. Numerous items (as well as a few pleasant surprises) that might have been found in one of these rooms surrounded the instruments: a hat rack, lamps with beaded fringes, rugs and throws, a framed photo (of Professor Longhair) on an end table behind the piano, lush curtains, a chandelier hanging over the middle of the stage and a stuffed pheasant—yes, a pheasant. The only thing missing was a comfortable period couch.
Appearing onstage at 8:15pm, in a black formal long coat, dark pants with a green checkered box design and a bluish purple tuxedo shirt, Laurie raised a shot of single malt and announced in his inimitable British accent, "Good evening, New York!" As the capacity crowd broke into enthusiastic applause, Laurie continued, "I like how that sounds. I think I'm going to say that a lot tonight." Laurie continued with a few minutes of disarming chat that included, "Thank you for coming out tonight. I realize this represents a gigantic leap of faith on your part. As many of you know I was until very recently an actor and now you've entrusted me to play music for you." After another round of wild applause, Laurie stated, "Imagine if a pilot said, 'Until a couple weeks ago I was a dental hygienist,'" and then his voice trailed off amid the laughter. With a sly smirk on his face he gleefully pointed to his band and added, "However badly I screw up, listen to them. Look at me, but listen to them."
He then suggested that it was time to "get all the photography over with." Laurie then pantomimed while promising that "these are the six poses that I will be adopting." Once finished with the posturing and hamming it up for the crowd, Laurie asked a member of the audience seated in the first row to e-mail the pictures to the rest of the members of the audience. He then said it was time to begin "getting the show under way," spun around and, along with drummer Jay Bellerose and the other musicians that comprise The Copper Bottom Band, play-acted the exaggerated motions of starting an outboard motor.

The members of the Copper Bottom Band took their places and kicked off the performance with an amazing version of Little Walter's "Mellow Down Easy." The next number was an inspired take on Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong
1901 - 1971
trumpet
's "St. James Infirmary," at the end of which Laurie exclaimed, "Good evening, New York! As you may have guessed, that was 'St. James Infirmary.' Let's be honest, the clues were there." He then explained that the song was "based on an 18th Century British folk song about a sailor who fucks a lot and winds up in St. James Infirmary with syphilis. The interesting thing is that St. James Infirmary is now St. James Palace. Hmmmph."

Laurie then led the band through a boogie woogie audience participation version of "Let The Good Times Roll" that featured the house lights brightening during the chorus.

With the crowd clearly eating out of the palm of his hand, Laurie got up from the piano bench and said, "Thank you, you're too kind and for that you get this." He took off his jacket and strapped on his guitar while telling a story about Leadbelly and explaining that he was released from prison because he sang for the governor of Louisiana. He then did a stellar version of "You Don't Know My Mind." As the last notes of the song faded away into the cheers applause from the crowd, Laurie decided to introduce his band. He began with Vincent Henry, who Laurie said was "in charge of all the blowy things." Keyboardist/accordionist Patrick Warren was presented as "playing all the notes I can't play—and there are many." Guitarist Kevin Breit was introduced, followed by Bellerose, bassist David Piltch ("His legal name is the incredible David Piltch") and vocalist Sister Jean McClain.

comments powered by Disqus
Support All About Jazz Through Amazon

Weekly Giveaways

Michael Carvin

Michael Carvin

About | Enter

Steve Wilson/Lewis Nash

Steve Wilson/Lewis Nash

About | Enter

Tom Chang

Tom Chang

About | Enter

Cedar Walton

Cedar Walton

About | Enter

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW