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David Gilmore: Getting To The Point

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To continue to grow in your knowledge and expansion takes so much more effort when you'e older, and when you hit a certain level
Sometimes, a series of small disparate observations dovetail to produce incredulity, stupefaction and even anger. Here we go. Have you noticed that Nat Hentoff has set off a bit not his first bit) of controversy with his December 2001 "Final Chorus , which can be found on the last page of every issue of Jazz Times. Nat took occasion to knock a couple of the more well-known current crop of jazz divas. Suspending, for the purpose of avoiding litigation, the issue of whether I agree or disagree with the estimable and always spot-on Mr. Hentoff, I include the following quote:



"Jane Monheit's success is a triumph of savvy management and publicity?"the right clubs and television spots aided by scribes who have temporarily suspended their jazz judgment.

He then went on to quote the Jazz Times review of her cd (by another critic for the magazine) implying she was not a jazz singer at all, to wit:



"Monheit's rehearsed, theatrical quality has less in common with jazz musicians than torch singers, cabaret artists and those who sing musical theater."

Like loads of folks, I find this extremely intriguing, but unlike them it has absolutely zero to do with any opinion of mine regarding Jane Monheit. See, here's the thing. I happen to know that the Jazz Journalist Association (JJA) nominated four cds for "Recording Debut of the Year for their jazz year, April 15, 2000 to April 15, 2001. Here they are:

  1. Tony Malaby, Sabino (Arabesque)
  2. Jane Monheit, Never Neverland (N-Coded Music)
  3. Claudia Acuna, Wind from the South (Verve)
  4. David Gilmore, Ritualism (Kashka)

This nomination list was particularly important to me, because I am one of the few jazz journalists to have reviewed David's gem of a recording. And by the way, if you believe me, it was indeed the Recording Debut of that Year by a jazz artist. In addition, another web-based critic, www.about.com 's Blaine Fallis (who can now be found at over at www.modernjazz.com ) picked it as one of the ten best releases of the calendar year 2000, in all categories. Well, Ms. Monheit won. The JJA didn't publish the final tally, but for the sake of argument, let's assume Mr. Gilmore came in second. Well then, if you believe the Jazz Journalists Association and you believe Nat Hentoff, by transitivity of jazz logic, David's Ritualism should (or could) then be considered de facto, the debut jazz release of 2000. A well-deserved, yet inference driven, kudo for David.



Bear with me here... I'm not angry yet. What blows my mind is this. In the course of completing this interview, it has come to my attention that Ritualism has yet to be reviewed by any of the major jazz periodicals, although it was serviced to all of them. Now, David is not only on an independent label, he's on a really independent label-his own. Personally, I should think jazz publications should recognize who David is, having played with Steve Coleman, Cassandra Wilson, Don Byron, Graham Haynes, Uri Caine, Trilok Gurtu and Mister Wayne Shorter, but let's give the staffer, maybe even an intern, the benefit of the doubt. Look a tad deeper, though, and it gets a bit more disrespectful, considering the recording happens to feature a guy named Coltrane (Ravi, who by the way, has just started his own independent imprint, called RKM Music). And what of the nomination by the JJA for Debut Recording of the Year? Yeesh. So, this raises a few issues. Are the mag staffers talking to the journalists, or vice-versa? Is such treatment an indie smackdown? Is it just the product of some huge perception and communication problems? Should the independents follow some established "establishment rules of networking that have not been revealed to them? Read on, and you'll get some points of view on the controversial indie issue, and more importantly, a look into the mind behind the most slammingly polyrhythmic, yet accessible, jazz release to come down the pike this millennium.



AAJ: What factors most strongly contributed to you finally getting a solo project together?

DG:It was something I'd been planning for a long time. Originally I was trying to do it with a small Austrian label called PAO and ended up wasting too much time negotiating a deal. At the point where I realized it wasn't going to work out, I just wanted to do something and get it out there badly. I was inspired by what Dave Fiuczynski and his wife Lian had done and a few others, like Tim Berne and his label.

Plus, some of the music was stuff I'd been playing over a couple of years, so it was really ready. The rest I came up with for the session. I borrowed a whole lot of money and went into a whole lotta debt and there it was.

AAJ: And it probably takes less money, relatively anyway, than it's ever taken.

DG: Sure. I was able to cut costs a little myself because I have somewhat of a home studio here. I did it mostly live in the studio and some overdubs at the house. I did all the edits myself, bouncing ADATS of the session to my hard drive.


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