Amazon.com Widgets

Creed Taylor, Incorporated: The AAJ Interview, Part 2-3

By Published: | 17,429 views
So we had the first shot on "Let It Be." It happened to be Hubert Laws who was in the right place at the right time.
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Introduction

Without the contributions of producer and entrepreneur Creed Taylor, the past, present and future of jazz would be differently written.

Five decades ago, Creed Taylor produced some of Bethlehem Records' best albums, including sets by Charles Mingus, Kai Winding with J.J. Johnson, and singer Chris Connor. He became known for his meticulous preparation and musicians' ear (Taylor also plays trumpet), and in 1960 formed the Impulse! jazz subsidiary of ABC-Paramount Records. The Impulse! label quickly became synonymous with great music, releasing such jazz classics as John Coltrane's landmark A Love Supreme and Oliver Nelson's Blues and the Abstract Truth. Then, when Verve Records was sold to MGM, Taylor moved on to serve as head of Verve.

At Verve, Taylor directed nothing less than a worldwide musical revolution, fueling the international wave of "bossa nova" through collaborations with Antonio Carlos Jobim, Stan Getz, Charlie Byrd, and others. "The Girl From Ipanema" won the 1964 Record of the Year Grammy Award and the album from which it came, Getz / Gilberto, won four more Grammys including Best Jazz Album and Album of the Year.

That "Girl" remains a rare almost inexplicable moment of musical magic: Taylor, saxophonist Getz and Brazilian guitarist / vocalist Joao Gilberto romantically dance through a Jobim program, but it was Gilberto's wife Astrud whose unaffected, slightly unsure voice breathed life into "The Girl." It was her first professional performance.

Stop his story there, and Taylor's musical legacy would be secure. But he moved on to team with Jerry Moss and Herb Albert and produce albums for A&M, claiming more Grammys and gold for his work with Wes Montgomery, then in 1968 he became his own boss, forming CTI Records—Creed Taylor, Inc.

Along with the Les McCann, Eddie Harris, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk albums Joel Dorn was making for Atlantic Records, CTI Records typified the 1970s fusion decade. But while Dorn often seemed intent on making gutbucket soul records, Taylor's explored lush orchestral arrangements of originals, pop and jazz standards, and contemporary pop and rock hits with a fluid jazz roster that included Freddie Hubbard, George Benson, Stanley Turrentine, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, Milt Jackson, and Hubert Laws easily trading lead and sideman roles.



Photo Caption: Taylor with emcee Sammy Davis Jr., Monica (Mrs. Stan) Getz (on Creed's left) and vocalist Astrud Gilberto (on Creed's right), accepting the 1964 Record of the Year Grammy Award for "The Girl From Ipanema." The Getz / Gilberto album from which it came was also honored with the Best Engineered Recording (Non-Classical), Best Instrumental Jazz Performance (for Getz), Best Jazz Album, and Album of the Year Grammy Awards. Getz / Gilberto was received into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999 and the single in 2000. Exclusive, never before published photo courtesy of Creed Taylor. [click photo for larger version]

After a hiatus due to financial circumstances, CTI Records returned in the 1990s. Taylor still has not stopped, releasing Summerflood by Jurgen Friedrich (piano) and Kenny Wheeler (flugelhorn) in 2003 to critical acclaim. Taylor is also raising his internet profile through an active role in www.ctirecords.com. "We need all the support we can possibly get compiling links to our internet presence because the competition is just so heavy," he explains. "I'd like certainly to be very clear about the fact that this is the means of distribution of the jazz that I'm involved with now." Half a century from his Bethlehem days, forty years after striking artistic and commercial gold with "The Girl From Ipanema," Taylor continues with his body of work. His story and jazz his-tory seem forever intertwined.



Part 2: CTI—Creed Taylor, Incorporated

CT: So that was the beginning of it. Then the last project I did was getting Coltrane on Impulse! before I left for the Verve situation. After the first four albums, Norman Granz sold Verve to MGM and MGM didn't have anybody to take Norman's place and Norman didn't want to continue after he sold the label. So I simply went across the street—literally right across the street to MGM's office—and opened up the Verve situation.

AAJ: Where your "bossa nova" records help create a worldwide phenomenon. Did you ever work with Jobim in the studio, and when did you realize what a worldwide craze your Verve music helped ignite?

CT: I produced everything. He was the nicest, most naive person you could ever meet. I went down to Brazil a few times and spent some time at his house and met all the players down there. Then of course after "Desifinado" (ed. note: from the Charlie Byrd / Stan Getz album Jazz Samba) became a hit, Jobim wanted to come up and see what New York was like, so he came in to see me right off the bat. That started a long friendship and series of albums.

comments powered by Disqus
Support All About Jazz Through Amazon

Weekly Giveaways

Wadada Leo Smith

Wadada Leo Smith

About | Enter

Mort Weiss

Mort Weiss

About | Enter

Rotem Sivan

Rotem Sivan

About | Enter

Michael Carvin

Michael Carvin

About | Enter

Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.