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Conversation with Scott Colley

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A lot of the musicians I see out there are really open to allowing all these different ideas, different music from all over the world, music from different points in history, to make their way into the language that they?re using for improvisation.
Though he doesn't know it, I owe composer/bassist Scott Colley quite a bit. It was hearing Mr. Colley perform at the Jazz Bakery in Los Angeles several years ago that fully opened my ears to the expressive force of the bass. Certainly, I'd always possessed a certain predilection for the bass, but it wasn't until after watching Colley tear up the stage with band mates Ravi Coltrane, Adam Rodgers, and Bill Stewart that I found myself digging through old recordings, exploring instrument dictionaries, and re-reading history books in a focused attempt to absorb as much about the bass as possible.

Since then, this interest has only grown, leading me not only toward other great bassists of past and present, but opening up entire sub-genres of jazz as well. For example, I rediscovered the piano trio format'this time falling deeply in love with it'as I traced the various lineages of bass development from Blanton to Brown, Pettiford, Mitchell, and Carter, stumbling of course upon Scott LaFarro along the way and with him the Bill Evans trio.

I mention this purely personal reflection only to emphasize how infectious Colley's playing can be. His muscular bass lines don't simply drive the music they bore straight through your cranium, delve into your brain, and lodge deep in your bones. You won't find your body swaying to the grooves throughout just next day, but the next week. And if you're anything like me, you just might find yourself drawn through Colley's melodic and improvisational clarity toward a whole new way of perceiving the instrument.

That said, it should come as no surprise that I was greatly looking forward to speaking with Mr. Colley about his current work as player, band leader, and composer. The conversation took place via phone, Mr. Colley speaking from his home as he relaxed following a recent tour with Herbie Hancock. Enjoying a vacation spent catching up on sleep, writing, and most important of all, spending time with his young daughter, Colley will be returning to the road this month as part of the Chris Potter Quartet. For those who have not yet seen Mr. Colley perform live, the upcoming tour promises to be'as always'an exceedingly worthwhile experience.

All About Jazz: You've been doing a lot of touring recently, haven't you?

Scott Colley: Well, right now I'm on vacation. For a month. I'm taking a month off, which I haven't done for'I don't think I've ever done this! You're one of my few appointments for the month. But, yes, we just finished an almost six week tour with Herbie[Hancock], Terri Lynn Carrington, and Bobby Hutcherson as a quartet which is great and the first time we've done that with Bobby. It was really a great time.

AAJ: How did you hook up with Herbie?

SC: Actually, I had done some recording with Terri Lynn and then I think through Terri Lynn and some recordings of mine, he heard me. I've been playing with him for about two and a half years.

AAJ: The recording with Terri Lynn, is that with Jim Hall?

SC: Yes'that was the first time I played with Terri Lynn, it was a Greg Osby record. I think it's called The Invisible Hand. I thought that was a really amazing record.

AAJ: I concur. I love the line-up on that recording.

SC: First of all, I was just amazed that he was actually able to get Jim Hall and Andrew Hill in the same place at the same time. Neither one of them work as sidemen on anybody else's records, as far as I know. So I was amazed that he[Osby] was able to pull that off. [laughing]

I think the result was great. Especially the tune'he did an arrangement of 'Nature Boy' that's really beautiful.

AAJ: I totally agree. 'Nature Boy' happens to be one of my favorite compositions and that rendition is really wonderful'

You've been touring with Chris Potter recently as well, correct?

SC: Yes. Those have been my primary touring projects for the past year or so. As well as other projects'Herbie has a project with the Gary Thomas Quartet and we also do some trio stuff. Herbie has started an orchestra project arranged by Bob Faden. He's been doing that with trio and different orchestras. We did it recently with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra which was quite amazing.

AAJ: So basically, you've been incredibly busy.

SC: Umm'yeah! Herbie is always busy. He's got so many different things on his mind. Between Chris's stuff and these other things, I've been traveling quite a bit.

AAJ: That's something that always stands out to me about jazz musicians. There always seems to be this endurance-test factor to their tours. All the one-nighters. And long, long tours.

SC: Yeah, well, if the music is something that you are really interested in'like the specific projects I've been doing'it's hard for me to say no.

AAJ: For sure, for sure. Now I've got to go back and ask some of the requisite questions. How did you get started on the bass?

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