Bruce A. Henry: Connections (2004)

By Published: | 3,144 views
How we rate: our writers tend to review music they like within their preferred genres.

Bruce A. Henry: Connections
Back in this fan's formative listening years, the record racks had a section that carried the label "Rhythm & Blues." There you'd find everything from early Motown—Smoky Robinson and the Marvelettes, The Four Tops, Marvin Gaye, Marvin and Tammi, the Temptations and the Supremes; and from other labels specializing in "soul sounds": Gene McDaniels, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Ray Charles...

I mention this bit of history because vocalist Bruce A. Henry sounds very much like a forward extension of that tradition, a carrying on of the things Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye and Curtis Mayfield were doing as the decade of the sixties drew to a close, bringing in a jazz spirit and an uplifting Afro-Centrism into a soul/blues/jazz mix.

And that is a very good thing.

Henry's Connections opens with the soaring Gill Scott Heron/John Coltrane anthem "Equinox," pared down Coltrane Style—bass, drums piano, sax; then it rolls into a Langston Hughes poem, proud and unstoppably dignified, with music supplied by Henry: "Darker Brother/I Too Sing America." In between lies Freddie Hubbard's "Red Clay," and further on you'll find perhaps the highlight, a linked trio of Mongo Santamaria's "Afro Blue" and the Henry-penned "Africa Cries Prelude" and "Africa Cries."

Henry's one and a half octave vocal range delves into a rich baritone on his haunting original, "Moon," and rises elsewhere to a creamy Bobby Blue Bland delivery—I'm truly reminded of Bobby Blue on "Red Clay" and "House of the Rising Sun." A set that includes the occasional horn section, lady background vocals, infectious grooves—a cooking version of Earth Wind and Fire's "Mighty, Mighty"— the bouncing percolation of "Afro Blue," the solemn, spiritual reverence of "Africa Cries," all this makes Connections an outstanding and original vocal effort, produced to near perfection.

A small mistake is a version of Ellington's "In a Sentimental Mood" that has a surpisingly—given the vibrancy and joy of the rest of the set—leaden rhythm and sterile production. Just hit the fast forward button. It's the only time you'll need it. The repeat button will will be in full use on everything else.

Visit Bruce A. Henry on the web at www.bruceahenry.com .

Track Listing: Equinox, On the Red Clay, Darker Brother/I Too, Sing; In a Sentimental Mood, Might, Mighty; Africa Cries Prelude, Africa Cries, Afro Blue, House of the Rising Sun, Sound of Music, Moon

Personnel: Vocals--Bruce A. Henry; bass--Anthony Ciox, James A. Young III, Gordy Johnson, Enrique Toussaint; Keys--Peter Schimke, Adi Yeseya, Sean Truner, Nachito Herrera; Drums--Kevin Washington, Michael Becker, Daryl Boudreaux, Gordy Knudtsen

Style: Vocal


comments powered by Disqus
Sponsor: ECM Records | BUY NOW

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.

or search site with Google