Bathed in Lightning: John McLaughlin, the 60s and the Emerald Beyond by Colin Harper

By Published: | 5,741 views
Bathed in Lightning: John McLaughlin, the 60s and the Emerald Beyond
Colin Harper
480 Pages
ISBN: 978-1908279514
Jawbone
2014

Few guitarists in the history of jazz have leapt onto the scene the way John McLaughlin
John McLaughlin
John McLaughlin
b.1942
guitar
did when the relatively new British expat made two very different appearances on albums by seminal American artists in 1969: first, with drummer Tony Williams
Tony Williams
Tony Williams
1945 - 1997
drums
' then-new group, Lifetime on the dense, intense and intentionally supersonically loud Emergency! (Polydor); and then on another groundbreaking but easier on the ears yet equally innovative recording, In a Silent Way (Columbia), the album that changed everything for Miles Davis
Miles Davis
Miles Davis
1926 - 1991
trumpet
—a longtime Williams employer, though the drummer had left the trumpeter's group by the time the album was released in July, 1969. On Davis' album, McLaughlin played (as instructed by the trumpeter), "like you don't know how to play guitar," the result being a sparer, cleaner and more spacious approach that may have been somewhat naïve for the guitarist, but was still light years ahead of most guitarists on the planet. On Williams' record, on the other hand, McLaughlin was overdriven into the red, his raucous, unfettered lightning speed phrasing something that seemed to be coming from not just a different planet, but a different universe.

But while McLaughlin's rapid rise to fame—an ascendance that was cemented even further when he formed the legendary Mahavishnu Orchestra
Mahavishnu Orchestra
Mahavishnu Orchestra
b.1971
band/orchestra
in 1971, releasing an album that truly shook the world, The Inner Mounting Flame (Columbia)—seemed to come out of nowhere, the truth (as it usually is), is that McLaughlin did not emerge from a vacuum. Instead, the guitarist spent time in the 1960s as a session player on the increasingly vibrant London scene, rubbing shoulders with everyone from pre-Led Zeppelin Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones to Rolling Stones
Rolling Stones
Rolling Stones

band/orchestra
touring pianist-to-be Nicky Hopkins and already Stones rhythm section Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts, on records by everyone from Paul Anka and Dionne Warwick to Donovan, Petula Clarke, Herman's Hermits and Engelbert Humperdinck. He also struggled as an aspiring guitarist in the bands of lesser-knowns like singers Herbie Goins and Duffy Powers, as well as making more jazz-centric appearances on albums like pianist Gordon Beck
Gordon Beck
Gordon Beck
1935 - 2011
piano
's Experiments with Pops(Major/Minor, 1968) and on Canadian expat trumpeter Kenny Wheeler
Kenny Wheeler
Kenny Wheeler
1930 - 2014
trumpet
's impressive leader debut, Windmill Tilter (Fontana, 1969).

All of this and more is covered in Colin Harper's superb Bathed in Lightning: John McLaughlin, the 60s and the Emerald Beyond, a lengthy but meticulously researched book that accomplishes a number of objectives. First, Harper documents McLaughlin's humblest of humble beginnings as a guitarist who, from a very early stage, was already demonstrating the massive talent that would ultimately lead to his becoming known as not just one of the most accomplished guitarists in England, but in the entire world. Harper also provides detailed insight into the London scene of the '60s, told through the prism of McLaughlin's career to be sure, but not by any means focusing exclusively on it.

The author doesn't reinvent the wheel, citing reference material from Walter Kolosky's Power, Passion and Beauty: The Story of the Legendary Mahavishnu Orchestra (Abstract Logix, 2006) where appropriate, but he also reveals plenty of new insights as well, in particular spending significant time exploring more deeply the man who would give McLaughlin his name Mahavishnu: the guru Sri Chinmoy—a man who, Harper ultimately demonstrates, was, indeed, just a man, with the same weaknesses as those he purported to teach to transcend such foibles. Chinmoy was just one step along the path of McLaughlin's search for enlightenment—while a seemingly long time at the time, decades later placed into proper context as just five years out of the guitarist's now-long life. The guitarist was already searching for purpose and understanding when he met Chinmoy, and when it became clear that the guru was not the man he thought he was, the guitarist dropped the name Mahavishnu and became, once again, just John McLaughlin (which, clearly, was plenty good enough).

comments powered by Disqus
Sponsor: Summit Records | BUY NOW

Enter it twice.
To the weekly jazz events calendar

Enter the numbers in the graphic
Enter the code in this picture

Log in

One moment, you will be redirected shortly.

or search site with Google